Amazing magnetic bug could pave way to novel biotech and nanotech uses

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An international team of scientists have discovered and mined out a new type of magnetic bacteria.

Scientists have dentified, isolated and successfully grown  a new kind of magnetic bug that could open the way to biotech and nanotech uses,  reveals a study.

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Use Cucumbers and Other Natural Products To Keep Insects Away

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Repel Pests Naturally!

You may not know it, but your salad fixings may already contain some natural insect repellents. Home improvement blog Apartment Therapy suggests using cucumbers to keep ants away, along with other natural repellents that keep multi-legged home invaders at bay.

Instead of using harsh chemicals to keep bugs away, try some natural, free solutions…

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Amazing Animal Photography – The Art of the Animal

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Defining moments in the life of animals

Animals bring a rare form of beauty to the world around us. Their lives exist like ours, with seemingly endless tedium followed by brief moments of something spectacular. The following are a series of photos that do a terrific job of capturing the spectacular moments. Some are downright breathtaking. (Pics)

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Can Insect Farming Solve World Hunger?

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How many ways can you spell YUMMY!
The day when restaurants will serve garlic grasshoppers or beetle larva skewers is getting closer in Costa Rica, where scientists are “growing” insects for human consumption.

Entomologist Manuel Zumbado’s research into this alternative food source is inspired by practices in Africa, where insects have long been part of people’s diet.

With its rainforests playing host to countless insect species, including thousands that have yet to be identified, Costa Rica is a perfect breeding ground for the work.

From leaf-cutting ants to rhinoceros beetles and a dizzying flurry of butterflies, the Central American nation is also a haven of ecotourism. But is it the next hotbed of mouth-watering bugs?

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Brando “Spy Ear” Cellular Bug

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The intrusive little bugger.

This tiny little box is, in fact, a cell phone. Well, it’s half a cell phone. You stick a SIM card in there, dial it, and the box will silently answer and then transmit back whatever it hears going on around it. There’s a rechargeable battery inside, a single power LED, and no other configuration crap to mess with. $65 is kind of a lot for what is essentially a battery, microphone, and antenna, but for all of you vigilantes (or creepy people) out there, gathering evidence (or eavesdropping) doesn’t get much easier than this.

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Rare Microbe To Help Make A Better Biofuel

Rare Bug To Help Make A Better Biofuel

Zymetis is testing genetically modified bacteria that efficiently convert biomass into sugar.  

A tiny microbe found in the Chesapeake Bay is the focus of intense study for a biotech startup in College Park, MD. Zymetis has genetically modified a rare, cellulose-eating bacterium to break down and convert cellulose into sugars necessary to make ethanol, and it recently completed its first commercial-scale trial. Earlier this year, the company ran the modified microbe through a series of tests in large fermenters and found that it was able to convert one ton of cellulosic plant fiber into sugar in 72 hours. The trial, researchers say, illustrates the organism’s potential in helping to produce ethanol cheaply and efficiently at industrial scales. Zymetis is now raising the first round of venture capital to bring the technology to commercial applications.

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