Emailing vaccines around the world

You could make a vaccine with a machine that synthesises DNA to an emailed sequence.

Craig Venter, who quietly sequenced the human genome using his own DNA, then made “synthetic life” by outfitting a gutted bacterium with homemade genes, says his next trick will be emailing biological molecules, using 3D biological printers. The move could revolutionise healthcare – and biological warfare.

 

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DNA sequencing is improving faster than Moore’s law

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzSXTWhBUD0&hd=1[/youtube]

The cost of sequencing genomes has declined 50% faster per year than the cost of computers, since 2007. Declining sequencing costs have been due to a combination of Moore’s law and massive scaleups. An author and an expert on the life sciences industry, Juan Enriquez, runs a venture capital fund that invests in life science startups that could produce useful products and treatments within the next five years.  He also engages in more long-term forecasting. In an interview for Next Big Future, Enriquez discusses the exponential rate of change for biotechnology with Sander Olson. Enrique also discusses why he believes that the changes wrought by the biosciences during the next three decades could surpass the industrial revolution in importance. (video)

 

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DNA from a crime scene could help police create an image of suspect’s face

The genes researchers found only have small effects, and are only linked with a limited number of features.

One day, police may be able to reconstruct the shape of a suspect’s face from their DNA. Thanks to identification of five genes that contribute to facial shape and features that possibility is getting closer.

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23andMe asking FDA to approve personalized DNA test

23andMe is part of a fledgling industry that allows consumers to peek into their genetic code.

23andMe, a genetic test maker,  is asking the Food and Drug Administration to approve its personalized DNA test in a move that, if successful, could boost acceptance of technology that is viewed skeptically by leading scientists who question its usefulness.

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Craig Venter: A 21st century perspective on life

Craig Venter

Craig Venter: I was asked earlier whether the goal is to dissect what Schrödinger had spoken and written, or to present the new summary, and I always like to be forward-looking, so I won’t give you a history lesson except for very briefly. I will present our findings on first on reading the genetic code, and then learning to synthesize and write the genetic code, and as many of you know, we synthesized an entire genome, booted it up to create an entirely new synthetic cell where every protein in the cell was based on the synthetic DNA code.

 

 

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Rapid DNA sequencing could soon become a routine part of your medical record

DNA sequencing

The latest technological competition involves the idea of threading a single strand of DNA through a tiny, molecular-scale eyelet known as a nanopore.

Rapid DNA sequencing can provide enormous amount of information previously sequestered in the human genome’s 3 billion nucleotide bases and soon may become a routine part of each individual’s medical record.

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Scientists discover gene that holds key to extending life 20 years

gene discovery

The gene, SIRT6, in laboratory mice and found it extended their lifespan by up to 15 per cent.

A gene has been discovered by scientists that could hold the key to extending life by up to two decades.  The gene is found in all mammals and is known to protect against age-related cell damage.

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DNA could be the next frontier for hackers and biological warfare

dna

Synthetic biology will lead to new forms of bioterrorism.

Computer-designed viruses that cure disease, new bacteria capable of synthesizing an unlimited fuel supply, new organisms that wipe out entire populations and bio-toxins that target world leaders may sound like devices restricted to feature-film script writers, but it is possible to create all of these today, using the latest advances in synthetic biology.

 

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