Whatever happened to the chemistry set?

By the 1920s and 30s children had access to substances which would raise eyebrows in today’s more safety-conscious times.

When you talk to people of a certain age about chemistry sets, a nostalgic glaze comes over their eyes.  The first chemistry sets for children included dangerous substances like uranium dust and sodium cyanide, but all that has changed.

 

 

 

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People Really Do Walk in Circles When Lost But We Don’t Know Why

desert test

Orientation experiment in the desert. 

Humans can’t walk in straight lines. If there’s no fixed point of reference, we just walk in circles and inevitably get lost. Nobody knows why, but researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics have confirmed it in several experiments. (pics)

 

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Scientists Announce They Can Decode Words from Brain Signals

brain computer

One day this technique could be used with paralysed patients and those ‘locked-in’ with brain damage.

A person’s mind is his or her castle. While the workings of a distant star or galaxy can be probed with precision, what goes on within the grey jelly that lies inside our skulls is  –  or has been until now  –  profoundly unknowable to the outside world.

 

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Californian’s Volunteer DNA for Largest Human Genome Study Ever Attempted

SFGENOME

Samples have been donated by thousands of Kaiser members.

Still in fine fettle at the age of 87, Ruth Young, a retired Oakland school nurse, jumped at the chance, she said, to “spit for the cause.”  Mrs. Young is one of more than 130,000 members of Kaiser Permanente in Northern California who have volunteered to have their DNA scanned by robotic, high-speed gene-reading machines as part of the largest human genome study of its kind ever attempted.

 

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Most Explosive Videos On The Internet

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhQ4dE_RGnQ&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

1. Blowing an anvil 200ft into the air.  This stunt has scant scientific or educational value, but deserves a prominent place on the list for the presenter’s coltish enthusiasm for explosions.

From science experiments to building demolitions to nuclear tests, there are few things in life more visually impressive than explosions. Here are 15 of the most dramatic.

 

 

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Cool Liquid Nitrogen Videos

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpgV53EWLI0&feature=player_embedded[/youtube]

Dry ice vs. soap 

I’m sure we all still fondly remember sitting in our high school science classes, marvelling at how cool liquid nitrogen is. I mean, it freezes anything in seconds – what’s cooler than that? You’ll be surprised – in this week’s video selection we take a look at some of the even cooler things that you can do with liquid nitrogen!

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The Eyes Have It When It Comes To Face Recognition

The Eyes Have It When It Comes To Face Recognition

Face recognition mechanisms in the brain are specialized to the eyes

Our brain extracts important information for face recognition principally from the eyes, and secondly from the mouth and nose, according to a new study from a researcher at the University of Barcelona. This result, published March 27th in the open-access journal PLoS Computational Biology, was obtained by analyzing several hundred face images in a way similar to that of the brain.

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Scientists Use Own Children As Test Subjects

Scientists Use Own Children As Test Subjects 

Even before his son was born, Pawan Sinha saw unique potential.  At a birthing class, Dr. Sinha, a neuroscience professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, stunned everyone, including his wife, by saying he was excited about the baby’s birth “because I really want to study him and do experiments with him.” He did, too, strapping a camera on baby Darius’s head, recording what he looked at.

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