Monkeys Trained As Battlefield Killers In Afghanistan

Killer_monkey26978
Showing Off A Killer Monkey
Afghanistan’s Taliban warlords have developed a bizarre way to deal with foreign forces: they have trained monkeys who love to eat bananas and peanuts to be killers. Taliban forces have taught monkeys how to use the Kalashnikov, Bren light machine gun and trench mortars. They also teach them how to identify and attack soldiers wearing U.S. military uniforms.

Ironically, the idea of training monkeys to fight was first invented by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA in the Vietnam War initiated a program that used the peanuts and bananas as prizes to train some “monkey soldiers” to kill Vietnamese in the jungle.

It is reported that these monkey soldiers are mainly composed of macaques and baboons hunted at an early age in the jungle and sold to the Taliban…
0

Wild Cat Found Mimicking Monkey Calls; Predatory Trickery Documented for the First Time in Wild Felids in Americas

100708141620-large

Marguay

In a fascinating example of vocal mimicry, researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and UFAM (Federal University of Amazonas) have documented a wild cat species imitating the call of its intended victim: a small, squirrel-sized monkey known as a pied tamarin. This is the first recorded instance of a wild cat species in the Americas mimicking the calls of its prey.

Continue reading… “Wild Cat Found Mimicking Monkey Calls; Predatory Trickery Documented for the First Time in Wild Felids in Americas”

0

Primates’ Social Intelligence Overestimated: Primates Groom Others If Afraid They’d Lose Fight

100107083909-large

Two wild long-tailed macaques in the Sacred Monkey Forest, Ubud, Bali in Indonesia.

The grooming behaviour displayed by primates is due to less rational behaviour than often thought. According to a computer model developed by scientists at the University of Groningen, one basic rule explains all possible grooming patterns: individuals will groom others if they’re afraid they’ll lose from them in a fight.

Continue reading… “Primates’ Social Intelligence Overestimated: Primates Groom Others If Afraid They’d Lose Fight”

0

Coconut-Carrying Octopus Surprises Scientists

091214121953-large

An octopus shows how it can carry a coconut shell under its
body while using its eight arms as stilts.

Scientists once thought of tool use as a defining feature of humans. That’s until examples of tool use came in from other primates, along with birds and an array of other mammals. Now, a report in the December 14th issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, adds an octopus to the growing list of tool users. (Video)

Continue reading… “Coconut-Carrying Octopus Surprises Scientists”

0

Hormone That Affects Finger Length Key To Social Behavior

091104101553-large

White-faced Capuchin (Cebus capucinus) checking its nails

Research at the universities of Liverpool and Oxford into the finger length of primate species has revealed that cooperative behavior is linked to exposure to hormone levels in the womb.

Continue reading… “Hormone That Affects Finger Length Key To Social Behavior”

0

Rhesus Macaque Monkey Moms ‘Go Gaga’ For Baby, Too

091008123224-large

Baby rhesus macaque.

The intense exchanges that human mothers share with their newborn infants may have some pretty deep roots, suggests a study of rhesus macaques reported online on October 8th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. Continue reading… “Rhesus Macaque Monkey Moms ‘Go Gaga’ For Baby, Too”

0

Monkeys’ Grooming Habits Provide New Clues To How We Socialize

090930175731-large

Grooming monkeys. A study of female monkeys’ grooming habits provides new clues about the way we humans socialize.

A study of female monkeys’ grooming habits provides new clues about the way we humans socialise. New research, published September 30 in Proceedings of the Royal Society, reveals there is a link between the size of the brain, in particular the neocortex which is responsible for higher-level thinking, and the size and number of grooming clusters that monkeys belong to.

Continue reading… “Monkeys’ Grooming Habits Provide New Clues To How We Socialize”

0

African Origin Of Anthropoid Primates Called Into Question With New Fossil Discovery

bonobo-ig-1

monkeys origin called into question with new fossil discovery.

Well-preserved craniodental fossil remains from two primate species have been discovered during excavations at an Algerian site. They reveal that the small primate Algeripithecus, which is 50 million years old and until now was considered as the most ancient African anthropoid, in fact belonged to another group, that of the crown strepsirhines.

Continue reading… “African Origin Of Anthropoid Primates Called Into Question With New Fossil Discovery”

0

Evidence Points To Conscious ‘Metacognition’ In Some Nonhuman Animals

090914172644-large

Dolphins like Natua, pictured here, may share with humans the ability reflect upon their states of mind, says UB researcher David Smith.

Smith makes this conclusion in an article published the September issue of the journal Trends in Cognitive Science (Volume 13, Issue 9). He reviews this new and rapidly developing area of comparative inquiry, describing its milestones and its prospects for continued progress. Continue reading… “Evidence Points To Conscious ‘Metacognition’ In Some Nonhuman Animals”

0

Monkeys Follow Economic Rules Of Supply And Demand

090902122448

A monkey that has acquired the sole power to hand out apples is generously rewarded with grooming sessions by the other monkeys in its group.

A monkey that has acquired the sole power to hand out apples is generously rewarded with grooming sessions by the other monkeys in its group. But as soon as another monkey can hand out apples as well, the market value of the first monkey is halved. Continue reading… “Monkeys Follow Economic Rules Of Supply And Demand”

0