3D printed bio patch can reverse heart attacks and keep hearts beating

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Stretchable electronics make it possible to custom fit pacemakers for each patient.

Scientists have developed an interconnected web of sensors and electrodes that can monitor someone’s heart around the clock, as well as deliver tiny electrical impulses to ensure it keeps beating properly. This even applies to catastrophic events such as a heart attack, which the device can often reverse. Thanks to the use of 3D printing, each device can be custom fitted to an individual patient to ensure the best possible results.

 

 

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Pacemaker under tongue may stop snoring

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The Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulation System, works by stimulating the nerve which controls the muscles of tongue.

Scientists have come up with a new pacemaker-style device which they claim when implanted underneath one’s tongue could help stop snoring. A team claims that the new implant, called the Hypoglossal Nerve Stimulation System, works by stimulating the nerve which controls the muscles of tongue, thus helping reduce the severity of sleep apnoea, a major cause of snoring.

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Brain Pacemaker Zaps Away Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

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Obsessive compulsive disorder is a specific psychiatric disorder characterized by obsessional thoughts and compulsive behavior.

An electrical treatment which zaps away symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) can help extreme sufferers unable to cope with everyday life, a ground-breaking study has shown.   The pacemaker-like therapy, known as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), involves passing a weak current through thin wire electrodes inserted deep into the brain.

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Implanted Pacemaker-like Device Zaps Tongue to Block Snoring, Sleep Apnea

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Rik Krohn displays the remote control unit he uses to turn on an experimental nerve stimulator to combat his sleep apnea.

Loud snoring may do more than irritate your spouse: It can signal sleep apnea , depriving you of enough zzzz’s to trigger a car crash, even a heart attack.

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Fuel Cell for Pacemaker Is Powered Directly From The Human Body

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Generally, pacemaker batteries last for several years. But a new technology developed by researchers at Joseph Fourier University in France may make that long-lasting battery obsolete. This device may be able to generate electrical energy by absorbing glucose inside the human body. It’s sort of like hosting an alien parasite, except without the irritating chest-bursting side effects. In Fast Company, Kit Eaton writes:

The trick the scientists worked out was to build the cell’s electrodes out of compressed graphite, which has been treated with enzymes that oxidize incoming glucose molecules, with a resulting release of electrical energy…

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First Wi-Fi Pacemaker In US Allows Doctors To Monitor Health Over The Internet

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Two of St. Jude Medical’s latest devices, a pacemaker and an AICD, that feature company’s wireless reporting technology.

After relying on a pacemaker for 20 years, Carol Kasyjanski has become the first American recipient of a wireless pacemaker that allows her doctor to monitor her health from afar — over the Internet.

 

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Electrical Stimulation Through The Spinal Cord May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms

Electrical Stimulation Through The Spinal Cord May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms

Neural activity in the brain of a Parkinsonian rat before (top) and after (bottom) electrical stimulation is applied to its spinal cord.  

Delivering electrical stimulation to the spinal cord through tiny, platinum electrodes could ease the severe motor deficits of Parkinson’s disease as effectively as a much more intrusive procedure currently in clinical use, according to a new study in rodents. If the findings are confirmed in humans, scientists say, the procedure could dramatically improve treatment for the disease by making electrical therapies safer and more broadly available.

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