Stunning Details of Brain Connections Revealed

Visual reconstruction of synapses in the mouse somatosensory cortex

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, applying a state-of-the-art imaging system to brain-tissue samples from mice, have been able to quickly and accurately locate and count the myriad connections between nerve cells in unprecedented detail, as well as to capture and catalog those connections’ surprising variety.

Continue reading… “Stunning Details of Brain Connections Revealed”

Phantom Images Stored in Flexible Network Throughout Brain

Phantom Images on Brain 763

The brain can compensate for some memory loss

Brain research over the past 30 years has shown that if a part of the brain controlling movement or sensation or language is lost because of a stroke or injury, other parts of the brain can take over the lost function — often as well as the region that was lost.

Continue reading… “Phantom Images Stored in Flexible Network Throughout Brain”

Seeing the Brain Hear Reveals Surprises About How Sound Is Processed

100201093037-large

The left shows thousands of dye-loaded cells in the mouse auditory cortex over a large area. The right shows the preferred frequency of many cells, and shows that neighboring cells can have dramatically different frequency preference.

New research shows our brains are a lot more chaotic than previously thought, and that this might be a good thing. Neurobiologists at the University of Maryland have discovered information about how the brain processes sound that challenges previous understandings of the auditory cortex that suggested an organization based on precise neuronal maps. In the first study of the auditory cortex conducted using advanced imaging techniques, Patrick Kanold, Assistant Professor of Biology, Shihab Shamma, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Sharba Bandyopadhyay, post-doctoral.

Continue reading… “Seeing the Brain Hear Reveals Surprises About How Sound Is Processed”

New Brain Connections Form Rapidly During Motor Learning

091129153359-large

New connections begin to form between brain cells almost immediately as animals learn a new task, according to a new study.

New connections begin to form between brain cells almost immediately as animals learn a new task, according to a study published recently in Nature. Led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, the study involved detailed observations of the rewiring processes that take place in the brain during motor learning.

Continue reading… “New Brain Connections Form Rapidly During Motor Learning”