By 2030 U.S. Army will replace 25% of soldiers with robots

army robots

The U.S. Army has recently declared that it is cutting troop levels. Over the next sixteen years, each and every brigade in the Army will see its soldier count drop from 4,000 to 3,000, with robots making up the loss in firepower. That’s according to General Robert Cone, who said robot soldier levels would reach their new peak between 2030 and 2040 during an Army Aviation symposium last week.

 

 

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Neuroscience could assist soldiers in the future

neuroscience

Neuroscience in future military conflict, on the cutting edge of medical science should remember that their work could have other, more harmful uses.

It sounds like science fiction warfare.  But directed energy weapons that use wave beams to cause pain, and electrical brain stimulation that boosts a soldier’s combat ability are advances in neuroscience are on the horizon.

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DARPA’s SCENICC to Give Soldiers Terminator Vision

soldier

Soldier Centric Imaging via Computational Cameras effort or SCENICC

With an intention to see how best they can equip the soldier of tomorrow, Pentagon’s mad science agency DARPA has on December 22 unveiled the Soldier Centric Imaging via Computational Cameras effort or SCENICC – a wearable helmet attached eye-gear that’s a set of cameras capable of capturing a kilometer-wide, 360-degree images viewable in 3D by the soldier laden with the eye wear. Wearing this gadget that scan objects a kilometer away and inform the soldiers of any danger, would allow the soldier to see anything from right behind him to everything in front by zooming in and creating stereoscopic/binocular system providing 10x zoom to both eyes, this, all hands-free by a pre-programming adjustable focus.

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DARPA’s Latest Pursuit – Helmets That Can Control Soldiers’ Brain Activity With Ultrasound

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The helmets are supposed to enhance the soldier’s cognitive abilities.

One of DARPA’s latest pursuits of cutting-edge research involves a neurotechnology lab at Arizona State University that specializes in ultrasonic brain stimulation. By implementing the technology in soldiers’ helmets, DARPA hopes to provide advantages to US troops by enhancing cognitive abilities; improving long-term alertness; and reducing stress, anxiety, and pain.

 

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HEADS 2nd Generation Smart Concussion Sensor For Soldiers Helmets Unveiled

heads

The Generation II HEADS helmet sensor indicates when soldiers have received a concussive blow to the head.

The problem with head injuries is that people who receive them often don’t realize how serious they actually are, until it’s too late. That’s why BAE Systems developed the Headborne Energy Analysis and Diagnostic System (HEADS) helmet sensor back in 2008. Used by the US Army and Marine Corps, the sensor is mounted inside soldiers’ helmets, and indicates when it has received concussive force sufficient to cause a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Last week at the Farnborough International Air Show, BAE announced the launch of the second generation of HEADS sensors.

 

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How Future Computer Games Will Simulate Real Smells Of War

How Future Computer Games Will Simulate Real Smells Of War

Jars holding the aromas. Realistic smells could soon be added to video games.  

It is one of the most memorable lines in movie history. As the air around him is rent by explosions and the whiz of bullets, Colonel Kilgore stands nonchalantly with hands on hips, sniffs the acrid breeze and declares: ‘I love the smell of napalm in the morning.’
 

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Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions

Helmet Patch To Measure Soldier’s Exposure To Explosions 

The Palo Alto Research Center is using ink-jet printing technology to develop a disposable patch that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet for seven days to measure his or her exposure to blasts. 

Researchers are developing a cheap, lightweight plastic strip that can be worn on a soldier’s helmet to help diagnose brain injury.

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