TapSense: New touchscreen technology recognizes different parts of the finger

tapsense

TapSense is an experimental touchscreen system, that is able to tell the difference between different parts of the user’s finger.

Devices with small touchscreens, such as smartphones, certainly have their attractions, but they also have one drawback – there isn’t much room on their little screens for touch-sensitive features. Users will sometimes have to go into sub-menus, or make do with jabbing their fingers at tiny controls. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute, however, are working on an alternative. Their prototype TapSense system can differentiate between screen taps from different parts of the finger, and will perform different tasks accordingly. (Pics and video)

 

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An Inexpensive Pressure-Sensitive Touch Pad Makes Surfaces Smarter

kevin perlin

Ken Perlin (left) and Ilya Rosenberg show off the plastic sheets that are the starting point for their pressure-sensitive touch pads.

Now that more and more smart phones and MP3 players have touch-screen interfaces, people have grown accustomed to interacting with gadgets using only taps and swipes of their fingers. But on the 11th floor of a downtown Manhattan building, New York University researchers Ilya Rosenberg and Ken Perlin are developing an interface that goes even further. It’s a thin pad that responds precisely to pressure from not only a finger but a range of objects, such as a foot, a stylus, or a drumstick. And it can sense multiple inputs at once.

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