How technology is helping the most helpless

human-trafficking

As a new study from the University of Arizona about sex trafficking during the Super Bowl highlights, advances in data analysis are underpinning some powerful new ways of tackling very tough problems. Among all the stones hurled at the tech sector lately, this is an area in which it can take pride.

 

 

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NFL fandom based on Facebook likes

Facebook took a look at football fandom across the country as the Super Bowl gets closer.

The National Football League is one of the most popular sports in America with some incredibly devoted fans. At Facebook we have about 35 million account holders in the United States who have Liked a page for one of the 32 teams in the league, representing one of the most comprehensive samples of sports fanship ever collected. Put another way, more than 1 in 10 Americans have declared their support for an NFL team on Facebook.

 

 

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Social media is spoiling the Super Bowl ad surprises

Super Bowl ad surprises ruined by social media.

There is a growing feeling that marketers’ use of social media is ruining the surprise of Super Bowl ads. Last Super Bowl, just one memorable ad bucked this trend last Super Bowl–Chrysler’s offering with Clint Eastwood–while other firms such as Honda made similar versions available on YouTube and Facebook. General manager-brand marketing for Audi, Loren Angelo, reckons that, with just 24-48 hours’ worth of Internet chatter about the Super Bowl, the reveal is worth everything, allowing an advertiser to have “a much longer conversation with consumers.”

 

 

Continue reading… “Social media is spoiling the Super Bowl ad surprises”

It’s the year of social media for Super Bowl ads

volkswagen

Advertisers are falling over themselves to get their ads out on YouTube or as part of online contests, like Volkswagen has done this year.

A big social event every year is the Super Bowl.  During this year’s battle pitting the New York Giants against the New England Patriots, getting social will happen on screens and the sofa. (video)

Continue reading… “It’s the year of social media for Super Bowl ads”

The Story Behind the Leno, Letterman, Oprah Ad

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcEx767TIas[/youtube]

Super Bowl viewers were rubbing their eyes at the sight of a TV spot pairing CBS late-night host David Letterman with longtime NBC archrival Jay Leno, plus media magnate Oprah Winfrey.
Appearing early in the CBS-aired game Sunday, the ad depicted Letterman and Leno glumly sharing a couch watching the Super Bowl, with Winfrey seated between them trying to make peace.
Letterman grumbles, “This is the worst Super Bowl party ever.”
“Now, Dave, be nice,” Winfrey urges.
A disgruntled Leno replies that Letterman is only complaining “because I’m here.”
In a whiny high voice, Dave mocks what Jay has just said.
Oprah shakes her head and sighs.
That’s it. The spot only lasts 15 seconds.
It revisited a promo from the 2007 Super Bowl with Letterman and Winfrey watching the big game. But with the surprise addition of Leno, the 2010 version addresses in compact form the talk-show turmoil at NBC, and the soon-to-be-rekindled competition between Letterman and Leno when he reclaims NBC’s “The Tonight Show” on March 1.
In the age of “Avatar,” some viewers might have thought that getting Jay and Dave, plus the super-busy Oprah, together in the same frame was probably accomplished through sophisticated computer-graphic imagery.
But no, the spot was produced the old-fashioned way, according to Rob Burnett, executive producer of “Late Show with David Letterman.”
And it was put together quickly. And very hush-hush.
According to Burnett, CBS offered “Late Show” a slot for a promo to air during the Super Bowl.
“Dave had this idea, ‘What about getting Jay and Oprah together with me?’ and he wrote it,” Burnett explained by phone shortly after the spot had its single airing Sunday. (It is posted on the CBS Web site.)
“We said, ‘This is too funny to pass up.’ First we called Oprah.” Then Leno was approached, and he, too, signed on. That was two weeks ago.
Arrangements had to be made to get the Los Angeles-based Leno and the Chicago-based Winfrey to New York for filming – and do it without word getting out.
“Security was a big priority for us,” Burnett said. “We really wanted to keep this under wraps. There were a lot of internal logistical conversations about how to even get Jay and Oprah into our building secretly.”
Filming took place last Tuesday at the Ed Sullivan Theatre, home of “Late Show.” According to Burnett, Leno arrived in disguise: hooded sweatshirt, dark glasses and fake mustache. (Viewers might recall that, last Tuesday, NBC’s “The Biggest Loser” was extended by an hour, pre-empting Leno’s soon-to-end “Jay Leno Show” and enabling his round-trip dash to New York.)
Filming took less than a half-hour, Burnett said.
“It was quick, it was easy,” he said. “The attitude was professional and cordial. Dave and Jay were fine with each other.”
Maybe so. But that very funny, very startling promo has neatly paved the way for a late-night battle between rivals that will resume in just weeks.

Super Bowl viewers were rubbing their eyes at the sight of a TV spot pairing CBS late-night host David Letterman with longtime NBC archrival Jay Leno, plus media magnate Oprah Winfrey.

Appearing early in the CBS-aired game Sunday, the ad depicted Letterman and Leno glumly sharing a couch watching the Super Bowl, with Winfrey seated between them trying to make peace.

Continue reading… “The Story Behind the Leno, Letterman, Oprah Ad”

Sweet Tweets For The Super Bowl

tweets.png

See what happens when Springsteen shows his nipples?

 

Check out this neat interactive graphic of Twitter chatter during the Super Bowl. You can move the slider to see what people were tweeting during each minute of the game. Mouseover to find out what part of the country tweeted these words. Select subjects on the left to focus on the type of tweets.

Continue reading… “Sweet Tweets For The Super Bowl”

Super Bowl Of The Future

superbowl_xliii.jpg

Hey stop yelling we want the super bowl how about we want the super cool super bowl

With Super Bowl XLIII coming up, we’re already thinking about what’s in store for the next one, and the one after that. Besides replacing all the human players with robots, which might be the norm a quarter-century from now because of the inherent danger of the game in our obsessively safety-first society, there are plenty of innovations in store for the coming years. Click Continue, and see what we’ll be looking for. Continue reading… “Super Bowl Of The Future”