Webcasting Surgeries To Promote Hospitals To Prospective Patients

Webcasting Surgeries To Promote Hospitals To Prospective Patients 

Webcast surgeries promoted with infomercials and advertisements

The point of Shila Renee Mullins’s brain surgery was to remove a malignant tumor threatening to paralyze her left side. But Methodist University Hospital in Memphis also saw an opportunity to promote the hospital to prospective patients.

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Robotic System That Will Operate On A Beating Heart

Robotic System That Will Operate On A Beating Heart 

This device lets surgeons attach small anchors to tissue inside a beating heart by compensating for the heart’s movement. 

Fixing the heart is hard. Certain procedures have to be performed on a stationary organ, so the heart is stopped and the patient put on a cardiopulmonary bypass machine. But stopping the heart increases the risk of brain damage. Now researchers at Harvard University and Children’s Hospital Boston are testing a robotic system that could help surgeons perform a common valve repair while the heart beats on. The system uses 3-D ultrasound images to predict and compensate for the motion of the heart so that the surgeon can work on a patient’s mitral valve as it moves.

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Symptons Of Heart Disease Attributed To Stress More Frequent In Women Than Men

Symptons Of Heart Disease Attributed To Stress More Frequent In Women Than Men

Research presented at the 20th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), found that coronary heart disease (CHD) symptoms presented in the context of a stressful life event were identified as psychogenic in origin when presented by women and organic in origin when presented by men. The study could help explain why there is often a delay in the assessment of women with heart disease.

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Hand Transplant Patient Shows Signs Of Sensory Recovery

Hand Transplant Patient Shows Signs Of Sensory Recovery 

Activation of the left cerebral hemisphere during sensory stimulation of the transplanted right palm.  

Four months after a successful hand transplant — 35 years after amputation in an industrial accident at age 19 — a 54-year-old man’s emerging sense of touch is registered in the former “hand area” of the his brain, says a University of Oregon neuroscientist.

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New Biomaterial Could Help In Knee Cartilage Repair

New Biomaterial Could Help In Knee Cartilage Repair 

 Abnormal Cartilage

A new biomaterial developed by Cartilix, a biotech startup based in Foster City, CA, could dramatically improve the success rate of knee-cartilage repair surgery, making the procedure more accessible to patients with bad knees. The new material, called ChonDux, consists of a polymer hydrogel that, when injected into the knee during surgery, guides the regeneration of cartilage by stimulating repair cells in the body.

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Tiny Handlike Gripper Could Make It Easier For Doctors

Tiny Handlike Gripper Could Make It Easier For Doctors

A tiny gripper that responds to chemical triggers could be a new tool for surgery.

A tiny handlike gripper that can grasp tissue or cell samples could make it easier for doctors to perform minimally invasive surgery, such as biopsies. The tiny device curls its “fingers” around an object when triggered chemically, and it can be moved around remotely with a magnet.

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Surgical Imaging System Turns Cancer Cells Neon

Surgical Imaging System Turns Cancer Cells Neon 

A real-time surgical imaging system (top) displays live video.  Image produced by the new system (bottom) shows a pig’s hind leg after injection of a contrast agent.  

Many cancer patients leave surgery still harboring dangerous tumor cells, while others suffer painful aftereffects because a surgeon has removed too much healthy tissue or nicked a nerve. A new imaging system that highlights cancerous tissue in lurid colors should help surgeons remove every last trace of cancer without harming the surrounding tissue. The system, currently in early clinical trials, uses a new class of contrast agents that emit near-infrared light and can attach to virtually any kind of tissue, cancerous or a healthy–showing surgeons just where to cut.

 

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