This one shocking factor can make you 4600 percent more likely to become an addict

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It was discovered quite by accident – in part of a study of a totally different subject.

One of my earliest memories is of trying to wake up one of my relatives, and not being able to. As I got older, I understood why. We had addiction in my family. And as I watched some of my other close relatives become addicts, I asked myself several questions, but one in particular seemed haunting and insistent: why does addiction so often run in families? Why does it seem to pass from mother to daughter, from father to son, as though it were some dark genetic twist?

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Medical helicopter increases odds of survival for trauma victims: Study

Medical helicopter

Medical helicopter beats ambulance for trauma victims.

For the critically injured, there are two choices for getting to a hospital – ground ambulance or helicopter.   While many critics decry the use of helicopters for emergency transportation because of cost and potential crashes, it turns out a trip to the ER via the sky may actually improve a person’s chances for survival.

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Military dogs suffer PTSD just like humans

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More than 5 percent of the approximately 650 military dogs deployed by American combat forces are developing canine PTSD.

Many soldiers leave the battlefield suffering deeply painful psychological traumas after returning home. And unfortunately, the same pattern of psychic trauma seems to apply for the dogs that help provide essential services for military men and women.

 

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Patients Admitted to the Hospital on the Weekend Are 10% More Likely to Die

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20 to 25 thousand people die each year in the United States because of admission on a weekend.

Ten percent of people admitted to the hospital on the weekend are more likely to die than those who checked in during the week, according to a new analysis of nearly 30 million people.

 

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Risk of Developing Alzheimer’s Could be Increased by Having Surgery

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Many doctors already suspect there may be a link between surgery and the onset of Alzheimer’s.

Patients who undergo major hospital operations could be at greater risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease, scientists believe. Tests carried out on mice have revealed changes in their brains, similar to those observed in humans with dementia, when the animals are operated on.

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Does Obesity Provide Cushioning During a Car Crash?

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Does extra padding help protect against severe trauma in a crash?

Some people believe obesity provides a cushioning effect in car crashes, with the extra padding helping to protect people against severe trauma. A few researchers set out to see if that’s true, using crash test dummies in simulated frontal crashes.

 

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Excessive Laptop Use Can Impact Sperm Production

Excessive Laptop Use Can Impact Sperm Production

Exessive laptop use can lower sperm count 

Excessive laptop use may impact men’s ability to become dads, says a new study. “Laptops are becoming increasingly common among young men wired into to the latest technology,” said Suzanne Kavic, MD, director of the division of reproductive endocrinology at Loyola University Health System (LUHS) and associate professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology and department of medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

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Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors

Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors 

A portable, noninvasive monitor developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. 

Patients with severe injuries or serious infections run the risk of circulatory shock–a life-threatening condition in which the blood can’t supply tissues with enough oxygen and nutrients. If shock is recognized in time, the patient can be resuscitated with oxygen, intravenous fluids, and medications. But catching shock early is no simple matter. A small infrared sensor currently under development at the University of Massachusetts Medical School promises to detect impending shock earlier than any other noninvasive test.

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