Highly skilled immigrants are losing interest in the United States: LinkedIn data

imigrants

According to a new study, the U.S. is quickly losing its appeal to the world’s most talented immigrants. Stanford and the University of Washington researchers have culled a large dataset from LinkedIn and found that the the number of Ph.D.s choosing the U.S. as their home base fell by nearly half (29 percent in 2000 vs. 18 percent in 2012).

 

 

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Where cats are more popular than dogs around the world

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There are only two types of people in the world: cat people and dog people. Data from Euromonitor, a market research firm, suggest that these differences extend beyond individual preferences and to the realm of geopolitics: it turns out there are cat countries and dog countries, too. (Video)

 

 

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Small and midsized companies struggle with their U.S.-based factories

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More than 80% of companies bringing work back to the U.S. have $200 million or less in sales.

In recent years, some small and midsize companies have brought manufacturing back to the U.S. but they have found it a bumpy road. Shortages of skilled workers are a common problem, as are difficulties navigating complex regulatory systems that govern modern American manufacturing.

 

 

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Future of the car industry looks surprisingly bright

The motor industry’s fortunes are increasingly divided, but in the right markets and with the right technologies, they look surprisingly bright.

Henry Ford and his engineers perfected the moving assembly line a hundred years ago. They cut the time taken to assemble a Ford Model T from 12 hours and 30 minutes in 1913 to just one hour and 33 minutes the following year. That made the car a lot cheaper to build and opened up a mass market for it. By 1918 its list price was down to $450, or just over 5 months’ pay for the average American worker, against the equivalent of about a year and a half’s pay when the car was launched a decade earlier. Cars became a personal badge of status, and in time carmaking became a badge of national virility.

 

 

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China is no longer the world’s most important source of growth

China’s economy is undergoing a structural slowdown.

China has been way out front as the world’s most important source of economic growth for years.  China has the world’s second largest economy and it continues to grow at a rapid clip but it is cooling as other enormous economies heat up.

 

 

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The cyber-cold war between China and U.S.

Cyber cold-war

A lengthy confidential list of computer addresses linked to a hacking group that has stolen terabytes of data for corporations in America was circulated to the country’s internet providers last week by the Obama administration.  But, it left out an important fact that almost every one of the digital addresses could be traced to he neighborhood in Shanghai that is headquarters to the Chinese military’s cybercommand.

 

 

 

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China Accuses U.S. of Launching Global ‘Internet War’

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Chinese military academy scholars urge tougher policing of the Internet.

On Friday, the Chinese military accused the U.S. on of launching a global “Internet war” to bring down Arab and other governments, redirecting the spotlight away from allegations of major online attacks on Western targets originating in China.

 

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