Here’s What Government Will Look Like in 2030

BY ZACH PATTON 

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Thirty experts, academics and big-picture thinkers on the biggest trends and issues that will shape state and local government over the next decade.

No one knows for certain what the future holds. But some people have a pretty good idea.

To get a sense of what the coming decade might mean for state and local governments, we asked more than two dozen futurists — including thought leaders, public officials, academics and tech experts — for their predictions on the trends that will have the greatest impact on the public sector over the next 10 years.

Their responses, condensed and edited here, provide a glimpse into what may happen in the years ahead.

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Post-Coronavirus era to require leaders Capable of anticipating unknown risks

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GENOA (UrduPoint News / Sputnik – 02nd April, 2020) The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic will last for a relatively brief period, but will however change the course of history and the nature of leadership, global trend researchers and forecasters have told Sputnik.

On Wednesday, World Health Organization (WHO) Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that he expected the global number of COVID-19 cases to reach 1 million in the next few days, and the death toll to rise to 50,000.

“Visionary thinking has always been a characteristic of great leaders. Now we will have to add a new dimension of incalculable probabilities. Thinking about the future and anticipating eventualities will be more in demand than ever. COVID-19 has demonstrated that we cannot ignore what is unknown,” John Naisbitt, an author and trends analyst said, adding that change is now “exploding exponentially in ways that we have never seen before in our lifetimes.”

According to Naisbitt’s spouse and internationally recognized speaker Doris Naisbitt, an old saying “he who hesitates is lost” is becoming increasingly relevant in the world of today and tomorrow.

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Virginia town where drone deliveries are daily

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Paul Sensmeier awaits his drone delivery

Futurist Thomas Frey has predicted that drones will become the most disruptive technology in human history. In a quiet residential neighborhood in Christiansburg, Virginia., one happens to be disrupting the work of two landscapers.

The workers silence their weed eaters, looking to the sky in wonder as the whining drone slows, descends, steadies, then hovers about 23 feet above the front yard of Paul and Susie Sensmeier, two retirees in their eighties.

The drone carries a three-pound plastic package, attached by a cord and a hook. It lowers the package until it softly touches down on the turf. The hook detaches, the line is reeled back in, and the craft zooms off into the horizon at 70 mph.

“There’s been no complaints that I know of from the neighborhood, and there’s quite a few customers that live here,” says Paul, a retired engineer who knows a thing or two about innovations in technology. His son works as an aerospace engineer, and his son-in-law is a researcher at the nearby Virginia Tech Transportation Institute. “It is the wave of the future, and it’s exciting to be a part of the developmental process.”

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What the future will look like for work, colleges

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For more than a century, automotive engineers have focused much of their attention on making vehicles as comfortable, safe and convenient as possible for drivers.

They’ve perfected the positioning of the steering wheel and gas pedal. Experimented with the best way to arrange knobs and controls. Determined the optimum placement of mirrors and other accessories.

What happens to all of this knowledge as cars become driverless? More important, how will an automotive engineer’s job change — and what new skills and knowledge will become essential to performing it?

This excerpt comes from an article in the upcoming issue of Community College Journal, which should be reaching your mailbox soon.

Futurist Thomas Frey uses this example to show how technology is fundamentally altering everything we thought we knew. This includes the nature of many long-standing occupations — and even the college experience.

“The world is changing rapidly,” says Frey, who is founder and executive director of the Colorado-based DaVinci Institute. “Ten years from now, education is going to look radically different. It might not feel like it, but we’re in the midst of a huge transition.”

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12 futuristic things that actually already exist

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The future is now

 As this list of items will reveal, the space-age electric future that we once only dreamed about is here. (Yes, right now!)

The speed at which technology is evolving and changing every aspect of our lives is astounding. Think about it. As Futurist Thomas Frey has pointed out, before 2007, our phones were…phones! They did not have the ability to stream every song in the known universe or tell us how to beat traffic on the way to the mall. And now? Your phone does everything. You use it to monitor and control your finances. It keeps you entertained in myriad ways. It checks your heart rate, how many steps you took today, and so much more.

In fact, many things that were once solely the dreams of science-fiction writers or only existed in episodes of The Jetsons are now basic parts of our everyday lives. Take a look at some of the crazy futuristic things that actually exist right now. And while you’re at it, check out these other products that will become “smart” in 2020.

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The future of jobs is already here

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One of the great challenges of the business world is predicting which jobs will grow and which will disappear. Several companies and institutions are working to solve this great mystery, including the World Economic Forum (WEF), an international organisation that “involves society’s leaders of politics, business, culture and other spheres in shaping global, regional and industrial agendas.”At the end of 2018, this organisation published the Future of Jobs Report, which analysed the trends predicted for the 2018–2022 period in 20 economies and 12 different industrial sectors.

“The increased demand for new roles will compensate for the decreased demand for others,” noted Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the WEF, in the preface to the forecast document. The German economist is optimistic about the predictions because, although five million jobs will disappear, another 133 million new ones will emerge.The technological revolution will change business models in all industries.

A phenomenon that the Davos World Forum has already dubbed the Fourth Industrial Revolution. High-speed mobile internet, artificial intelligence, big data analysis, cloud-storage of information, augmented and virtual reality, and others factors will spearhead the adoption of new technologies by businesses. They will also change the dynamics of work, the competences required of workers and the gender gap in industry.

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What is a futurist? 12 things to know about the coolest job you never knew you could have

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When you hear the word futurist, what comes to mind? You might think about those fortune teller stands at the fair — for $50, you can learn at what age you’ll die, if you will ever find true love, and address any other deep-seated insecurities. But where fortune tellers will root their predictions in divine forces and mystical unexplained powers, futurists make their predictions based on stone cold facts. A futurist is a kind of consultant who makes predictions based on future trends they identify. Their point of view can even impact how companies design products or how communities run their outreach, which makes being a futurist officially one of the coolest jobs of all time.

“When I was younger I didn’t know this job existed, so I often ask myself how I ended up with it,” Ford’s in-house futurist, Sheryl Connelly, tells Bustle. “What I really wanted to do was be an artist. But when I look back I feel like it was divine intervention or that it was my destiny.”

Futurists like Connelly spend their days recognizing trends, explaining why they’re recognizing it, and suggests how the trend might make an impact on a global scale — so that brands can take advantage of that forward-thinking insight for their future products. Sound complex? I agree, which is why I was surprised to learn that it’s a field that anyone can fall into — among other mind-blowing facts about this job. Here are 12 things all future futurists should know about this unconventional career path.

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What will technology jobs look like a decade from now?

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Individuals will need to upskill to ensure career longevity even as automation takes over certain jobs. Careers in vogue right now may not even exist a decade later.

India, till not so long ago, could not churn out enough software programmers to keep up with demand. Although the demand still exists, it has become more complex and specialised.

Thomas Frey, who advises companies on future trends, says every job will be a technology job going forward. “Emerging technology will provide a lot more opportunities, where every job will have a technology element to it. It will not be about humans versus artificial intelligence, but about working with them.

People, however, need to be taught how to do this and enhance their skills,” the famed futurist and celebrity speaker said.

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Futuristic advancements we can expect within the next decade

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Our society has made incredible advancements in technology, resulting in pivotal discoveries and accomplishments. We are lucky to be living in a time when science and innovation are proceeding at an increasingly rapid pace. The things we see as commonplace today were simply science-fiction just 10-20 years ago. Looking to the next decade, here are some marvelous technological advancements we can expect.

  Continue reading… “Futuristic advancements we can expect within the next decade”

Futuristic advancements we can expect within the next decade

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Our society has made incredible advancements in technology, resulting in pivotal discoveries and accomplishments. We are lucky to be living in a time when science and innovation are proceeding at an increasingly rapid pace. The things we see as commonplace today were simply science-fiction just 10-20 years ago. Looking to the next decade, here are some marvelous technological advancements we can expect.

Continue reading… “Futuristic advancements we can expect within the next decade”

Cities declare war on cars as more auto bans stop traffic

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New York City fired the latest salvo in the war against automobiles Wednesday.

 The City Council passed a $1.7 billion plan that will fundamentally change how the citizens of the Big Apple bike, bus, and walk through Manhattan, Queen, Brooklyn, the Bronx and Staten Island. The five boroughs in the next five years will see the building of 250 miles of protected bike lanes, 150 miles of dedicated bus lanes and create additional pedestrian plazas.

Two weeks ago, San Francisco unveiled a $604 million project to ban cars from their busiest thoroughfare, Market Street, where a half-million pedestrians walk on what is one of the most dangerous streets for traffic accidents, executive director of Walk San Francisco Jodie Medeiros recently told Curbed San Francisco

“It’s a war on cars, number one, bottom line,” Car Coach and automotive industry expert Lauren Fix told FOX Business. “It’s what’s called a road diet, restricting roads to force people to use mass transit, which is horrible! It’s filthy, never not on time, not in the U.S. at least, and it’s not safe. The city allows pan handlers and drug addicts to sleep on the trains and beg for money. I’ll take an Uber or a cab before I take public transportation.”

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