Cell phone carriers reject kill switch for stolen smartphones

Carriers don’t want anti-theft software for fear it would eat into the profits.

Lawmakers in San Francisco and New York have been pushing hardware makers like Samsung to provide anti-theft software for cell phones that would allow owners to remotely deactivate a phone should it get stolen, rendering it useless. But according to the San Francisco district attorney, George Gascón, carriers like Verizon, AT&T, and Sprint aren’t crazy about the idea of implementing such a “kill switch.” Why? Because they’d lose money.

 

 

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Mobile phone carriers profit from phone theft ‘are not innocent,’ says DC police chief

Carriers benefit from phone theft.

Theft of mobile phones is a massive and growing problem, accounting for more than 40 percent of all thefts in San Francisco in 2012. But is that a good thing for mobile carriers like AT&T and Verizon?

 

 

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Mobile phone carriers keep personal data for up to seven years

cellphone users

The document says AT&T keeps for five to seven years a record of who text messages whom.

The ACLU has obtained a document that shows for the first time how the four largest cellphone companies in the U.S. treat data about their subscribers’ calls, text messages, Web surfing and approximate locations.

 

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Nuclear Detection By Cellphone

Nuclear Detection By Cellphone 

Researchers at Purdue University are working on tech that will turn every cellphone into a roaming nuclear weapon sniffer and are lobbying Congress to legally require cellphone users and carriers to participate. The Distributed Nuclear Detection by Ubiquitous Cellphone project would be kind of like the massive cellphone dragnet in The Dark Knight, but it would look for terrorists sneaking dirty bombs and nuclear weapons instead of the Joker.

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Carriers Losing Control of Mobile Content

Carriers Losing Control of Mobile Content

US Mobile phone users are obtaining mobile content from a variety of sources, including the Web, from their personal collections, and from their wireless carrier, according to a November 2007 survey conducted by ABI Research.

Of the 14% of mobile phone users who watched video on their phones, 35% did so through a Web site, 31% watched through a carrier’s offering and 28% had sideloaded it onto their phone.

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