Routine cholesterol testing for all children recommended by U.S. panel

cholesterol testing

Children should be routinely tested for high cholesterol.

9 to 11 year old children should be routinely screened for high cholesterol so that action can be taken to avoid the development of heart disease, according to new guidelines from the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

 

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Super Rats Resistant to Disease!?

Can I Have Some of that Potion?

Everybody knows that if you’re physically fit, you’re less likely to get a wide range of diseases. What most people don’t know is that some people are “naturally” in better shape than others, and this variation in conditioning makes it difficult to test for disease risk and drug effectiveness in animal models.

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New Wonder Drug Tackles Obesity, Diabetes, Blood Pressure and Cholesterol All in One Jab

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New diet wonder drug may be available in 3 years.

A four-in-one diet drug that can help a woman drop two dress sizes in six months has been developed by scientists.  The jab, which could be available in three years, also lowers blood pressure, raises ‘good’ cholesterol, and can prevent and even cure diabetes.

 

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Snake Oil Chart Highlights the Worth (or Lack Thereof) of Supplements

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We’ve all got that friend or family member that swears by a supplement promising to stave off colds, cure headaches, or fix some other malady, but often they’re little more than snake oil. This Snake Oil chart matches supplements to scientific support.

The chart is a pretty simple idea: Items toward the top of the chart have strong scientific evidence supporting their health benefits (when taken orally by an adult with a healthy diet), while those toward the bottom have the least evidence supporting their worth. Each item also lists the supposed health benefit of said supplement. The larger a supplement’s circle, the more popular it is as a solution for a problem. Using green tea as a cholesterol helper is popular and strongly supported, for example, while the chart illustrates that although Vitamin E is popularly believed to help your heart and fight prostate cancer, there’s little evidence to support it…

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Even Small Dietary Reductions in Salt Could Mean Fewer Heart Attacks, Strokes and Deaths

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New research suggests reducing salt in the American diet by as little as one-half teaspoon (or three grams) per day could prevent nearly 100,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths each year.

Reducing salt in the American diet by as little as one-half teaspoon (or three grams) per day could prevent nearly 100,000 heart attacks and 92,000 deaths each year, according to a new study. Such benefits are on par with the benefits from reductions in smoking and could save the United States about $24 billion in healthcare costs, the researchers add.

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Couch Potato TV Time May Cut Life Short

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Every hour spent in front of the TV per day adds an 11% greater risk of premature death

Couch potatoes beware:  Every hour spent in front of the television per day brings with it an 11 percent greater risk of premature death from all causes, and an 18 percent greater risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, a new study by the Journal of the American Heart Association finds.

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Why Humans Outlive Apes: Human Genes Have Adapted to Inflammation, but We Are More Susceptible to Diseases of Aging

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A baby chimp (Pan troglodytes) and his handler looking at each other.

In spite of their genetic similarity to humans, chimpanzees and great apes have maximum lifespans that rarely exceed 50 years. The difference, explains USC Davis School of Gerontology Professor Caleb Finch, is that as humans evolved genes that enabled them to better adjust to levels of infection and inflammation and to the high cholesterol levels of their meat rich diets.

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Too Much Physical Activity May Lead to Arthritis, Study Suggests

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Runners.

Middle-aged men and women who engage in high levels of physical activity may be unknowingly causing damage to their knees and increasing their risk for osteoarthritis, according to a new study presented  at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

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‘Closed Heart Surgery’: Scientists Jump-start The Heart By Gene Transfer

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Human heart.

Scientists from the Universities of Michigan and Minnesota show in a research report published online in the FASEB Journal that gene therapy may be used to improve an ailing heart’s ability to contract properly. In addition to showing gene therapy’s potential for reversing the course of heart failure, it also offers a tantalizing glimpse of a day when “closed heart surgery” via gene therapy is as commonly prescribed as today’s cocktail of drugs.

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