Which U.S. cities have the most families with kids?

A man carries a young boy on his shoulders while walking inside Central Park as the colors of autumn become more prevalent in New York

Spoiler alert: It’s simply not the case that families with kids have disappeared from urban America.

Look around a hip neighborhood in Lower Manhattan or downtown San Francisco, and you’ll see lots of young people, and Baby Boomers whose kids have left the nest. There are also some stylish moms (or nannies) pushing tots in strollers. But you won’t see many traditional nuclear families with school-age children.

There’s a growing consensus that our cities are becoming “childless.” This past October, Axios ran a story on the ”great family exodus,” showing data that the share of families with children under the age of 20 has fallen in 53 large cities across the country. As far as I can tell, the phrase “childless cities” was first advanced in 2013 by Joel Kotkin in an essay of that title for City Journal.

Several factors are said to be pushing families with kids out of cities: the expensiveness of city living; the lagging performance of urban versus suburban public schools; and the preference of immigrant families for the suburbs over urban locations. But just how childless are our cities, really?

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Cost of child care more than college in much of the U.S.

Putting a baby and a 4-year-old into a child care center cost more than the annual median rent in every single state.

It is no surprise to parents that child care costs are getting costlier and costlier, according to a new report.  It costs families more to put an infant in a child care center than to cover tuition and fees at a public college in more than half of the states, according to a new analysis by Child Care Aware of America, a nonprofit advocacy group focused on child care access.

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What’s behind the increasing cost of raising a child in the U.S.

A child born in 2012 is estimated to cost $241,080 to raise.

It’s becoming increasingly expensive to have kids.  But it has never been cheaper to clothe and feed them, as well. The total cost of raising a child born in 2012 is estimated at $241,080 – and double that if your child attends college.  That’s a 23% increase from 1960. So what is getting more expensive?

 

 

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Top 10 best small towns in America 2011

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Louisville, Colorado, home of the DaVinci Institute, has been
ranked No. 1 as the best small city in America.

In the minds of most people the phrase “small town” conjures up images of happier times.When the economy wasn’t in the current state it is now. When unemployment wasn’t above 9%. When people didn’t stress out about home values. When school budgets weren’t under siege. Those were the days, right?

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Is buying Monopoly’s Boardwalk really worth it?

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Is buying Boardwalk the best strategy?

Monopoly is a bonding experience in some families. For other families, it’s a Machiavellian affair that tosses love and loyalty aside in favor of a capitalistic bloodlust where there is but one goal: Drive mom, dad, grandma and weird Uncle Steve into bankruptcy as soon as possible.

 

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Percentage of Families with Life Insurance is at It’s Lowest in 50 Years

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Consumers have had troubles keeping up paying their premiums during the economic downturn.

The percentage of U.S. households with life insurance coverage is at its lowest in 50 years, leaving millions of families without a safety net, industry experts say.Only 44% of households have an individual life insurance policy, and 30% have no individual or employer-provided life insurance, according to a recent survey by LIMRA, an industry-sponsored group. Some 11 million households with children younger than 18 — viewed as families with the greatest need for coverage — have no life insurance.

 

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Stay-at-Home Dads Have Increased Ten-Fold in Ten Years

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Men who have given up other jobs to concentrate on child-care

The number of fathers who stay at home to look after their children has increased ten-fold during the past decade, new research has shown.  Around 6 per cent of fathers, equivalent to 600,000 people, now consider themselves to be their child’s primary carer, up from just 60,000 who said this 10 years ago, according to insurance giant Aviva.

 

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Study: Moms and Dads Spend More Time With Their Families Than Parents of Earlier Generations

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Parents today spend more time with their families

Working parents perpetually agonize that they don’t see enough of their children. But a surprising new study finds that mothers and fathers alike are doing a better job than they think, spending far more time with their families than did parents of earlier generations.

 

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Do Women In Brazil Who Watch Soap Operas Have Fewer Babies (But More Men)?

Do Women In Brazil Who Watch Soap Operas Have Fewer Babies (But More Men)?

About 40M people watch Globo, the leading network in Brazil. 

THE glamorised world portrayed on the nightly telenovelas (soap operas) on Brazilian television is, superficially at least, about as representative of the country as a whole as Marie Antoinette and her shepherdesses were of 1780s’ France. But they are all about aspiration. About 40m people watch the mid-evening novela from Globo, the leading network. The action often takes place in Rio de Janeiro, where Globo is based, among families which are smaller, whiter and richer than average. New research suggests that by selling this version of the country to itself, Globo has boosted two important social trends.

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