Geothermal power plants could be a massive source of Lithium for batteries

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The Nesjavellir Geothermal Power Plant in Þingvellir, Iceland.

In absolute terms, lithium is not particularly rare on Earth. It’s the 25th most abundant element, close to nickel and lead. Bolivia alone is estimated to have enough lithium to make batteries for 4.8 billion electric cars, and since lithium is not destroyed in use – unlike fossil fuels – old batteries can be recycled into new ones, or used to smooth out the output of wind farms.
So the question isn’t: Will we have enough lithium? Rather, it’s more like: As demand for it explodes, can we ramp up production rapidly enough, at a low enough cost, and while keeping it as environmentally-friendly as possible. It’s still probably going to be much better to make a battery once and then use it for years with progressively cleaner electricity (as the grid incorporates more and more renewable energy) rather than fill up a gas tank with non-renewable fossil fuels from halfway around the world every week, but even in that scenario, it’s going to be better if we can get the lithium cleanly and close to where we’ll use it. That’s where geothermal power plants enter the picture…

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Land of Giants – Power Lines Turned Into a Work of Art

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Land of Giants

Most of us take the aesthetic nature of power lines and pylons for granted. In fact, it’s hard to remember a time before the things crisscrossed the landscape. That’s why we were stoked when we came across this concept by Massachusetts-based architects Choi+Shine. Part infrastructure, part public art project,

 

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Photo Gallery of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajokull Volcano

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Just days ago… Lightning flashes within a cloud of volcanic matter as it
rises from the erupting Eyjafjallajokull volcano

The volcano has now simmered to 80 per cent of its intensity, but scientists are warning that earth tremors could cause an even larger eruption at a neighbouring crater.
An eruption at the Katla volcano would be ten times stronger and shoot higher and larger plumes of ash into the air than its smaller neighbour.
The two volcanoes are side by side in southern Iceland, about 12 miles apart, and thought to be connected by a network of magma channels.
Katla is buried under one of Iceland’s largest glaciers, the Myrdalsjokull, which is 500m deep.
This means it has more than twice the amount of ice than the current eruption has burned through, threatening a new and possibly longer aviation standstill across Europe.

The volcano has now simmered to 80 per cent of its intensity, but scientists are warning that earth tremors could cause an even larger eruption at a neighbouring crater. An eruption at the Katla volcano would be ten times stronger and shoot higher and larger plumes of ash into the air than its smaller neighbour.

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Chefs Prepare Dinner on the Hot Lava of a Volcano in Iceland

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Romantic dinner in the shadow of the Fimmvorduhals volcano

There is absolutely no dearth of ways to make someone feel special. Culinary art is just one of them. Various means have been devised to prepare scrumptious and tempting cuisines to satiate gastronomical palates, but nothing like this has ever been done before. Chefs from Holt hotel hosted a romantic dinner for a Dutch couple in the shadow of Fimmvorduhals volcano in middle of the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in Iceland.  (Pics)

 

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Another All Time Low For Arctic Ice

Another All Time Low For Arctic Ice 

 Picture is comprised of Envisat ASAR mosaics of the Arctic Ocean and highlights the changes in sea ice between June and mid-August 2008. The dark grey color represents ice-free areas while blue represents areas covered with sea ice.

Following last summer’s record minimum ice cover in the Arctic, current observations from ESA’s Envisat satellite suggest that the extent of polar sea-ice may again shrink to a level very close to that of last year.

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