Wired magazine brings in 50% of its ad revenue from the web

The 50 percent digital revenue share also didn’t come as a result of a decline in print advertising sales.

One of the first big magazines devoted to technology and the internet is Wired.  Half of Wired magazine’s ad revenue was generated from the internet in Q4 2012.  This is a first for the magazine.

 

 

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Rethinking the way we publish online

Apple’s Newsstand

There is a pretty clear preference on the part of many publishers for creating an online or mobile experience that looks as much as possible like the physical magazine or newspaper it is intended to replace.  This is something Apple reinforces with its Newsstand platform, which has virtual shelves with tiny virtual magazine covers and newspaper front pages. In many cases this approach is not surprising, but is it the best way to either publish or consume content.  Which is why some of the most interesting experiments in online content are coming from those who are not just thinking outside of the box, but aren’t even willing to admit that there is a box.

 

 

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Chinese Plan to Acquire U.S. Media Businesses

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China’s bid for Newsweek was the first of many

China’s Southern Daily Group’s recent attempt to acquire Newsweek magazine – the country’s first bid for a Western publication – has failed, but the bidder is expecting to make other, similar purchases, the publication’s senior management said on Thursday.
“The offer to Newsweek is a volunteer action of Chinese media professionals and investors,” said Xiang Xi, managing editor of Southern Weekly, a weekly owned by the Group, who was granted an exclusive interview with President Obama during his visit to Beijing last November.
“With nine-language versions, Newsweek’s platform with global communication resources and influence is in line with our pursuits.”
The head of China’s most influential weekly denied any government involvement in the investments behind the bid for the Washington Post-owned news weekly.
Xiang said the Group partnered B-raymedia, a Shanghai-listed company based in Chengdu of Southwest China’s Sichuan province that owns several metropolis papers, and two other investment funds in the purchase attempt.
Secretary to the board of directors of B-raymedia surnamed Zhang told China Daily that the business talks involving bidding for overseas media have a long way to go.
“It is like dating,” Zhang said, “it doesn’t matter if one date does not like you. You grow from it.”
About 70 bidders are interested in acquiring the current affairs weekly. Newsweek, which has been engaged in a fierce decades-long rivalry with Time magazine, lost more than $28 million last year and advertising revenue dropped 37 percent.
“No information is going to be released until the transaction is completed,” Post spokeswoman Rima Calderon told AFP.
Xiang said the money is not what is keeping the Chinese bidder outside of the door.
“They don’t really understand Chinese media people,” he said. “They are not sure of why we are bidding. But I understand it is easier for a US media to take over the operation.”
The tagline of Southern Weekly – described by the New York Times as “China’s most influential liberal newspaper” – is “to understand China”.
Xiang said the move is for the world to have a better understanding of China, and for China to know more of the world.
The attempt to buy Newsweek is a beginning, said the 38-year-old, adding that they are “seeking to round up investors to bid on other media abroad.”
“The move is an encouraging trend for China’s going-out strategy,” said Yu Guoming, vice-president of the journalism school at the Beijing-based Renmin University of China. “The strategy has, for a long time, focused on overseas expansion of Chinese media.”
The global impact of China’s conventional media that speaks and thinks on Chinese logic has been questioned, he said.
“No matter if the media organization is State or privately owned, the Western stereotype always views it as a propaganda vehicle,” Yu said. “But it could be changed if Chinese media understand and play with the West’s rules.”
“The investment in Western media is our first step to get involved,” he said, “then the two sides can talk and know each other.”

China’s Southern Daily Group’s recent attempt to acquire Newsweek magazine – the country’s first bid for a Western publication – has failed, but the bidder is expecting to make other, similar purchases, the publication’s senior management said on Thursday.

“The offer to Newsweek is a volunteer action of Chinese media professionals and investors,” said Xiang Xi, managing editor of Southern Weekly, a weekly owned by the Group, who was granted an exclusive interview with President Obama during his visit to Beijing last November.

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The History of Paper For The Toilet

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Since the dawn of time, people have found nifty ways to clean up after the bathroom act. The most common solution was simply to grab what was at hand: coconuts, shells, snow, moss, hay, leaves, grass, corncobs, sheep’s wool—and, later, thanks to the printing press—newspapers, magazines, and pages of books. The ancient Greeks used clay and stone. The Romans, sponges and salt water. But the idea of a commercial product designed solely to wipe one’s bum? That started about 150 years ago, right here in the U.S.A. In less than a century, Uncle Sam’s marketing genius turned something disposable into something indispensable. 

How Toilet Paper Got on a Roll

The first products designed specifically to wipe one’s nethers were aloe-infused sheets of manila hemp dispensed from Kleenex-like boxes. They were invented in 1857 by a New York entrepreneur named Joseph Gayetty, who claimed his sheets prevented hemorrhoids. Gayetty was so proud of his therapeutic bathroom paper that he had his name printed on each sheet. But his success was limited…

Digital Version of Every National Geographic Issue Available on External Drive

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National Geopgraphic on external hard drive

National Geographic Magazine has been one of the most important publications ever printed. From the insightful articles to the brilliant photography, NatGeo has been the benchmark that other magazines compare themselves to. Now, you can own a copy of every single issue without having to build a new addition to your house to store it.

 

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The Magazine of the Future

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Sports Illustrated – Tablet Demo 1.5

This collaboration between The Wonderfactory and Time, Inc. is an excellent example of how tablets will enable the creation of innovative, addictive experiences by publishers, media companies, and advertisers. Second video after the jump.

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Video Ad To Run In Print Magazine

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CBS and Pepsi will tout ‘Monday to the Max’ in a video ad set to run in some copies of Entertainment Weekly.

To hawk its fall season, CBS has teamed with PepsiCo and Entertainment Weekly to create a video ad that will run in the magazine.

CBS will insert a paper-thin interactive video player into copies of the Sept. 18 issue of Time Inc.’s Entertainment Weekly sent to Los Angeles- and New York-area subscribers. The issue previews the 2009-2010 TV season. As part of a unique marketing partnership, PepsiCo will join with CBS to promote its Pepsi Max diet cola for men in the print ads and sponsor the fall debut of CBS’s Monday-night comedies on Sept. 21.

 

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UCLA Study: Media Bias Is Real

 UCLA Study: Media Bias Is Real

Media bias, is it fixable?

While the editorial page of The Wall Street Journal is conservative, the newspaper’s news pages are liberal, even more liberal than The New York Times. The Drudge Report may have a right-wing reputation, but it leans left. Coverage by public television and radio is conservative compared to the rest of the mainstream media. Meanwhile, almost all major media outlets tilt to the left.

These are just a few of the surprising findings from a UCLA-led study, which is believed to be the first successful attempt at objectively quantifying bias in a range of media outlets and ranking them accordingly.

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