U.S. newspapers have shed half of their newsroom employees since 2008

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Newsroom employment in the United States declined 23% between 2008 and 2019

Newsroom employment at U.S. newspapers continues to plummet, falling by around half since 2008, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data. But a modest increase in jobs after 2014 in other news-producing sectors – especially digital-native organizations – offset some of the losses at newspapers, helping to stabilize the overall number of U.S. newsroom employees in the last five years.

The years covered in the current analysis predate the spread of the coronavirus in the United States. The economic effects of the virus have led to a fresh round of layoffs, pay cuts and other changes at U.S. media outlets, especially newspapers.

From 2008 to 2019, overall newsroom employment in the U.S. dropped by 23%, according to the new analysis. In 2008, there were about 114,000 newsroom employees – reporters, editors, photographers and videographers – in five industries that produce news: newspaper, radio, broadcast television, cable and “other information services” (the best match for digital-native news publishers). By 2019, that number had declined to about 88,000, a loss of about 27,000 jobs.

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Millennials: keeping up with the news is important, but without paying for it

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According to a report released today by the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between the American Press Institute and the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, most millennials don’t seek out news on social media, but the vast majority of them get news from social networks once they see it there.   Continue reading… “Millennials: keeping up with the news is important, but without paying for it”

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The ongoing newspaper crisis by the numbers

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Publishers have failed to adequately respond to the new ways that consumers get information.

About ten years after the commercial debut of the Internet, America’s newspapers posted record high advertising sales of $49.4 billion in 2005. This lead many publishers to think their businesses would not be seriously affected by the digital revolution. But they were wrong.

 

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Most trusted source of info is still traditional media

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TV most trusted source of information.

Digital has caused some traditional media to suffer in terms of consumer time and attention—notably, print and radio—TV still takes up the bulk of US adults’ time with media. And Triton Digital research, a digital service provider for online and traditional radio, shows the medium also garners the most trust from consumers.

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Newspaper: America’s Fastest Shrinking Industry

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Are you working for the fastest shrinking industry in the United States? You are, if you’re working for a newspaper according to this study by LinkedIn and the Council of Economic Advisors.

The fastest-growing industries include renewables (+49.2%), internet (+24.6%), online publishing (+24.3%), and e-learning (+15.9%). Fastest-shrinking industries were newspapers (-28.4%), retail (-15.5%), building materials (-14.2%), and automotive (-12.8%)…

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Scientists produce biofuel from recycled newspapers

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Tulane University has applied for a patent for a method to produce the biofuel butanol from organic material.

Scientists have found one way that old-fashioned newspaper beats the internet. Tulane University scientists have discovered a novel bacterial strain, dubbed “TU-103,” that can use paper to produce butanol, a biofuel that can serve as a substitute for gasoline. They are currently experimenting with old editions of the Times Picayune, New Orleans’ venerable daily newspaper, with great success.

 

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State of the American News Media 2011: Report

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Why do networks still do news?

By several measures, the state of the American news media improved in 2010.

After two dreadful years, most sectors of the industry saw revenue begin to recover. With some notable exceptions, cutbacks in newsrooms eased. And while still more talk than action, some experiments with new revenue models began to show signs of blossoming.

 

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Chinese Plan to Acquire U.S. Media Businesses

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China’s bid for Newsweek was the first of many

China’s Southern Daily Group’s recent attempt to acquire Newsweek magazine – the country’s first bid for a Western publication – has failed, but the bidder is expecting to make other, similar purchases, the publication’s senior management said on Thursday.
“The offer to Newsweek is a volunteer action of Chinese media professionals and investors,” said Xiang Xi, managing editor of Southern Weekly, a weekly owned by the Group, who was granted an exclusive interview with President Obama during his visit to Beijing last November.
“With nine-language versions, Newsweek’s platform with global communication resources and influence is in line with our pursuits.”
The head of China’s most influential weekly denied any government involvement in the investments behind the bid for the Washington Post-owned news weekly.
Xiang said the Group partnered B-raymedia, a Shanghai-listed company based in Chengdu of Southwest China’s Sichuan province that owns several metropolis papers, and two other investment funds in the purchase attempt.
Secretary to the board of directors of B-raymedia surnamed Zhang told China Daily that the business talks involving bidding for overseas media have a long way to go.
“It is like dating,” Zhang said, “it doesn’t matter if one date does not like you. You grow from it.”
About 70 bidders are interested in acquiring the current affairs weekly. Newsweek, which has been engaged in a fierce decades-long rivalry with Time magazine, lost more than $28 million last year and advertising revenue dropped 37 percent.
“No information is going to be released until the transaction is completed,” Post spokeswoman Rima Calderon told AFP.
Xiang said the money is not what is keeping the Chinese bidder outside of the door.
“They don’t really understand Chinese media people,” he said. “They are not sure of why we are bidding. But I understand it is easier for a US media to take over the operation.”
The tagline of Southern Weekly – described by the New York Times as “China’s most influential liberal newspaper” – is “to understand China”.
Xiang said the move is for the world to have a better understanding of China, and for China to know more of the world.
The attempt to buy Newsweek is a beginning, said the 38-year-old, adding that they are “seeking to round up investors to bid on other media abroad.”
“The move is an encouraging trend for China’s going-out strategy,” said Yu Guoming, vice-president of the journalism school at the Beijing-based Renmin University of China. “The strategy has, for a long time, focused on overseas expansion of Chinese media.”
The global impact of China’s conventional media that speaks and thinks on Chinese logic has been questioned, he said.
“No matter if the media organization is State or privately owned, the Western stereotype always views it as a propaganda vehicle,” Yu said. “But it could be changed if Chinese media understand and play with the West’s rules.”
“The investment in Western media is our first step to get involved,” he said, “then the two sides can talk and know each other.”

China’s Southern Daily Group’s recent attempt to acquire Newsweek magazine – the country’s first bid for a Western publication – has failed, but the bidder is expecting to make other, similar purchases, the publication’s senior management said on Thursday.

“The offer to Newsweek is a volunteer action of Chinese media professionals and investors,” said Xiang Xi, managing editor of Southern Weekly, a weekly owned by the Group, who was granted an exclusive interview with President Obama during his visit to Beijing last November.

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LG Display Unveils 19 Inch Flexible ePaper

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LG’s newspaper size ePaper

LG Display has announced its development of a newspaper-size flexible e-paper. The 19-inch wide (250x400mm) flexible e-paper is almost as big as a page of A3 sized newspaper. The product is optimized for an e-newspaper and able to convey the feeling of reading an actual newspaper. Additionally, as the product measures 0.3 millimeters thin, the e-paper weighs just 130 grams despite its 19-inch size.

 

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