Top 11 Foods that Trigger Allergies

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Peanuts ranks #3 on the all-time allergy list

For some people, certain foods can trigger hives (an eruption of small welts), swollen lips, itchiness, flushing, eczema (rough, itchy patches), or a hot-to-the-touch rash, even if you’ve never reacted to a food before.
If the outbreak covers your entire body or is accompanied by chest tightness, wheezing, or shortness of breath, you’re having a full-blown allergic reaction.
If you know what food triggered your reaction, you can steer clear of it in the future. But if you’re not sure, write down everything you ate leading up to your outbreak, use this list of common culprits as a memory jogger, and talk with your doctor about allergy testing.
1. Cow’s milk
2. Eggs
3. Peanuts
4. Tree nuts (cashews, walnuts, almonds, etc.)
5. Shellfish
6. Soy
7. Wheat
8. Red wine
9. Citrus (limes, oranges, etc.)
10. Tomatoes
11. Hot spices, such as chili seasonings

For some people, certain foods can trigger hives (an eruption of small welts), swollen lips, itchiness, flushing, eczema (rough, itchy patches), or a hot-to-the-touch rash, even if you’ve never reacted to a food before.

Continue reading… “Top 11 Foods that Trigger Allergies”

Why Is Crying Beneficial?

Why Is Crying Beneficial? 

We’ve all experienced a “good cry”-whether following a breakup or just after a really stressful day, shedding some tears can often make us feel better and help us put things in perspective. But why is crying beneficial? And is there such a thing as a “bad cry”? University of South Florida psychologists Jonathan Rottenberg and Lauren M. Bylsma, along with their colleague Ad J.J.M. Vingerhoets of Tilburg University describe some of their recent findings about the psychology of crying in the December issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Nanonets Could Convert Sunlight Into Hydrogen

Nanonets Could Convert Sunlight Into Hydrogen

The top image shows a nanonet magnified 50,000 times. At bottom, a
flexible nanonet rolls up when poked by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

One problem with solar cells is that they only produce electricity during the day. A promising way to use the sun’s energy more efficiently is to enlist it to split water into hydrogen gas that can be stored and then employed at any time, day or night. A cheap new nanostructured material could prove an efficient catalyst for performing this reaction. Called a nanonet because of its two-dimensional branching structure, the material is made up of a compound that has been demonstrated to enable the water-splitting reaction. Because of its high surface area, the nanonet enhances this reaction.

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