Evaporative snowfalls

Localized snowfall.

If your choices were fog, foam or snow, wouldn’t snow be a welcome change from the others?

In the early 1990’s, Francisco Guerra started making snow for his magic act. Within a few years, special events, movies, and theme parks wanted to use this unique effect to create magical snowfall.

What is amazing about this effect is that the snow never accumulates. It evaporates within 90 seconds and leaves no residue. This biodegradable, non-toxic, non-slip, flame retardant effect can be performed indoors as well as outdoors, from a small dance floor to a theme park. Global Special Effects is known as the inventor of evaporative snow™…

Continue reading… “Evaporative snowfalls”

0

Woman Brings a Bit of Color to Snowfall

pink_snow 7968
Pinking up the snow. That old white is just too common.
An environmental artist in Fargo, N.D., says she paints the snow on her home’s yard a different coluor each time flakes fall.

While Fargo resident Stevie Famulari’s front yard currently is pink, the landscape architecture professor at North Dakota State University is eyeing purplish blue snow for the next snowfall.

Famulari’s color scheme, which includes darker colours as winter progresses, is intended to unveil a colorful rainbow when the snow finally melts.

0

Scientific Blunder Raises Question About Alarm Over Global Warming

Scientific Blunder Raises Question About Alarm Over Global Warming 

 October snow in London

A surreal scientific blunder last week raised a huge question mark about the temperature records that underpin the worldwide alarm over global warming. On Monday, Nasa’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS), which is run by Al Gore’s chief scientific ally, Dr James Hansen, and is one of four bodies responsible for monitoring global temperatures, announced that last month was the hottest October on record.

Continue reading… “Scientific Blunder Raises Question About Alarm Over Global Warming”

0

Insight Into Global Warming Through Weather History

Insight Into Global Warming Through Weather History 

 Mohonk Mountain House

It is probably a good thing that the Mohonk Mountain House, the 19th-century resort, was built on Shawangunk conglomerate, a concrete-hard quartz rock. Otherwise, the path to the National Weather Service’s cooperative station here surely would have turned to dust by now.

Continue reading… “Insight Into Global Warming Through Weather History”

0