Alternatives to Facebook

9E0057CB-8F26-4EA3-B795-FC154B77F175

Facebook has been under relentless attack since the Cambridge Analytica scandal in early 2018. Broadcasters and news publishers have declared open season on Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, and other senior executives at the company. And while not quite ubiquitous, #deletefacebook pops up every time there’s a story about data privacy. The EU has fined them, the US is trying to figure out how to regulate them, and the notion that free services should be absolutely free (as opposed to checking a box on a terms and conditions page that allows the free service to use your data as payment) is gaining traction.

Whether or not Facebook deserves the scrutiny it is under is a great topic for another article. Today, I want to have a look at alternatives. If you don’t like Facebook, what might work for you? Is the time right for the reemergence of focused social networks?

Continue reading… “Alternatives to Facebook”

0

The grim conclusions of the largest-ever study of fake news

IMG_5851

Falsehoods almost always beat out the truth on Twitter, penetrating further, faster, and deeper into the social network than accurate information.

A large megaphone projects lies, fake news, falsehoods, and images of Donald Trump, Mark Zuckerberg, and Hillary Clinton. A smaller megaphone projects truth.

Continue reading… “The grim conclusions of the largest-ever study of fake news”

0

Are we moving from nation states to stateless nations?

Old Globe

Philip Saunders: This is the age of disruption. What we’re witnessing is a shift from territorial monopolies on the use of force as a way of ordering civilization, toward a world of borderless civic networks. Or, in the words of Tom W. Bell, a move from nation states to stateless nations, which extend the dynamics of social networks into areas traditionally monopolized by government.

Continue reading… “Are we moving from nation states to stateless nations?”

0

2013 blew apart our notions of privacy

2013 changed everything by demonstrating the extent and power of state — and commercial — surveillance.

2013 was an extraordinary year for those of us who are interested in privacy and data protection. What was previously seen as the domain of paranoid nitpickers has exploded into the public consciousness, shaking international ties and making many people re-evaluate how they live their lives online.

 

 

Continue reading… “2013 blew apart our notions of privacy”

0

Massive growth in mobile media consumption in 2013

Even as smartphone sales slow down, mobile-centric social networks, mobile video companies, and location based services are well positioned to feel the biggest benefits from the massive shift in consumer media consumption and usage patterns. But how can companies truly capitalize on this consumer revolution and adapt to their mobile-centric customers?

 

 

Continue reading… “Massive growth in mobile media consumption in 2013”

0

Blogs are more influential than social networks for driving purchases

Consumers agree the value of online communities comes from sharing information and ideas.

According to Technorati’s 2013 Digital Influence Report,  blogs are more influential than social networks in shaping consumers’ opinions and purchase decisions.

 

 

Continue reading… “Blogs are more influential than social networks for driving purchases”

0

Why the whole history of the web is wrong

About 43.5 percent of our social traffic are social networks we know.

In the early days of the web, pages of information linked to each other. Then along came web crawlers that helped you find what you wanted among all that information. Around 2003 or 2004, the social web really kicked into gear, and thereafter the web’s users began to connect with each other more and more often. Hence Web 2.0, Wikipedia, MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, etc. This is the dominant history of the web as seen, for example, in this Wikipedia entry on the ‘Social Web.’

 

Continue reading… “Why the whole history of the web is wrong”

0