Lechal ‘smartshoes’ vibrate to point you in the right direction

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Lechal ‘smartshoes’

People in India will be the first in the world to get access to what could be the next big thing in wearable technology: the smartshoe. Ducere Technologies Pvt., an Indian startup, is going to start selling its Bluetooth enabled Lechal shoes for more than $100 a pair in September. The smartshoes sync up with a smartphone app that uses Google maps and vibrate to tell users when and where to turn to reach their destination.

 

 

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FingerReader enables visually impaired to read any printed or digital book

finger-reader

FingerReader

Louis Braille, in 1829, developed a tactile system that would allow those with vision impairment to read books. Braille uses a series of raised dots and the finger trails over a line of braille text and the reader interprets it, much like we do with standard letters of the alphabet that form words. Braille, however, does require some training to understand, and even now, most books, magazines, and newspapers are unavailable in braille format. MIT researchers have changed that problem with a new piece of wearable technology that reads books out loud to those with vision problems. (Video)

 

 

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Samsung develops ultrasonic smartphone case to help visually impaired sense their surroundings

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Samsung ultrasonic smartphone cover for the visually impaired.

A smartphone case that helps the visually impaired by enhancing their awareness of their surroundings has been developed by Samsung. The Ultrasonic Cover for its Galaxy Core Advance smartphone helps owners sense the presence of people and objects up to two meters away.

 

 

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VIA Uses Video Motion Detection and GPS Technology to Help Visually Impaired Get Around

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Aiming to help people who can’t see find a simpler way to get around, designer Noam Klopper has introduced the Visually Impaired Assistant (VIA).

 

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Bike Riding for the Blind and Visually Impaired in Mexico City

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Bike rides for the visually impaired and blind.

In a very interesting initiative that began last January, a group of three non governmental organizations from Mexico City are organizing bike rides for the blind and visually impaired. The rides are guided by volunteers on tandem bikes, and are offered on Sunday mornings, when a few streets in the historical center of the city are closed for pedestrians and human powered vehicles. What does this do for these people? More than you would think.

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VI Fit – Video Game Project to Help Blind Children Exercise

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VI Fit video games help visually impaired children become more physically active.

VI Fit, a project at the University of Nevada, Reno, helps children who are blind become more physically active and healthy through video games. The human-computer interaction research team in the computer science and engineering department has developed a motion-sensing-based tennis and bowling exergame.

 

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