Millennial life: How young adulthood today compares with prior generations

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Over the past 50 years – from the Silent Generation’s young adulthood to that of Millennials today – the United States has undergone large cultural and societal shifts. Now that the youngest Millennials are adults, how do they compare with those who were their age in the generations that came before them?

In general, they’re better educated – a factor tied to employment and financial well-being – but there is a sharp divide between the economic fortunes of those who have a college education and those who don’t.

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‘Post college towns’ teem with college-educated young adults, jobs

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Young adults spend leisurely time at Marion Square in Charleston, SC.

Jessica Duggan grew up in this starchy historic city in the 1990’s. She remembers field trips with her mother to the historic Battery neighborhood, watching tourists “doing the horse thing and the market thing.” She dreamed of staying here as an adult. But she had to admit that her hometown was hopelessly uncool.

 

 

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Being a young adult in America is a financial nightmare

Between the ages of 25 and 34, 41.3% percent of Americans will spend at least a year earning less than 150 percent of the poverty line.

In the world’s richest country, poverty is an astonishingly common experience. Almost 40 percent of American adults experience it for at least a year by age 60.  But poverty is especially common among young adults in America.

 

 

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Exactly how many college graduates live back at home?

College graduates who are unemployed and have had to move back in with their parents have become a stock figure of the past few years and is helping to cement the Millennials’ reputation as the “Boomerang Generation.” How many of these graduates are returning to live with mom and dad ((or their aunt or uncle)?

 

 

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41% of young adults skip health care as medical costs rise

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41% of young adults between age 19 and 29 failed to get medical care in a recent 12-month period because of cost.

There are millions of young adults who are skipping necessary care and treatment because of rising health care costs in the U.S., according to a new report released on Friday.

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Almost 1 in 5 Young Adults in the U.S. Has High Blood Pressure

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Being overweight or obese is a well-known risk factor for high blood pressure.

Expanding waistlines and higher body mass index of young adults are causing unexpected problems, including an increase in diabetes, kidney disease and even arthritis say federal health officials.

 

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Primary Source of News for Young Adults is Now the Internet

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Web is no longer playing catch-up among young adults

Television has long been the primary source of news for all Americans, but for the first time, young adults have changed that trend. Consumers ages 18 to 29 now say that the internet is their primary source of national and international news, according to The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

 

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People as Young as 25 Could be Screened for Dementia

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There is a possible connection between the energy-producing process in young adults and the later development of Alzheimer’s.

People as young as 25 could be screened and treated for dementia years before any symptoms develop after Alzheimer’s disease was linked to the way the brain uses sugar to make energy. Proteins called amyloid plaques which build up in the brain of dementia sufferers are thought to be linked to the onset of symptoms such as memory loss and mental impairment.

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Sleep-Deprived Teens Who Spend All Night Online Triple Their Chances of Mental Illness

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Over the past few decades young adults have been sleeping fewer and fewer hours.

Young people who rob themselves of sleep by spending all night surfing the internet and playing computer games are tripling their chances of developing a mental illness, according to research.   People who sleep less than five hours a night are up to three times more likely to become mentally ill than those sleeping eight or nine hours, the report said.

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