American Research Team Puts New Spin On Old Technique To Produce 3D-Printed Organs

A technician checks on a 3D printer as it constructs a model human figure in the exhibition ‘3D: printing the future’ in the Science Museum on October 8, 2013 in London, England. The exhibition, which opens to the public tomorrow, features over 600 3D printed objects ranging from: replacement organs, artworks, aircraft parts and a handgun.

By Michael Leidig

The idea, however, has been beset with technical problems that have, to date, limited the type of organs that can be printed.

With too few organs to go around to satisfy the demand for transplants, scientists are now pinning their hopes on the possibility of 3D-printing technology.

In the United States alone there are an estimated 112,000 people currently waiting for urgent transplants and there is, therefore, plenty of demand for the possibility of 3D-printed organs.

The idea, however, has been beset with technical problems that have, to date, limited the type of organs that can be printed.

But researchers at the Stevens Institute of Technology, a private research university in New Jersey, are now pushing through these barriers by revamping a decades-old technique to reproduce any tissue type.

The work, led by Robert Chang, an associate professor in the mechanical engineering department at Stevens’ Schaefer School of Engineering & Science, could open up pathways for 3D printing any kind of organ at any time, even skin directly on an open wound.

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With 3D-Printed Sperm Cells, Scientists Bring Hope To Many Men With Infertility

By Bharat Sharma

Scientists from Canada have successfully 3D printed male reproductive cells. Yes, you read that right! 3D-printed sperm is here!

In hopes of replicating what we see in the human body, scientists from the University of British Columbia are printing sperm. Led by Ryan Flannigan, a urology assistant professor, the team used a 3D printer to create “viable testicular cells” and later identified early signs of “sperm-producing capabilities,” Global News reported.

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ADDUP-BUILT L 3D PRINTER TO UNDERGO MICROGRAVITY TESTING ON THE ISS

A rendering of a mocked-up Metal3D system being used by astronauts.

By PAUL HANAPHY 

French industrial 3D printer manufacturer AddUp has revealed that a new system it has been helping develop is set to be launched into orbit for testing onboard the International Space Station (ISS). 

Working as part of the European Space Agency’s (ESA’s) ‘Metal3D’ project, AddUp has built the internal structure and mechanisms of a machine, designed specifically to 3D print metal parts in space. As opposed to regular powder bed-based systems, the demonstrator is said to process wire feedstock affixed to its frame, stopping it floating away, and allowing the unit to operate in microgravity conditions.

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X-BOW EXITS STEALTH MODE WITH ITS 3D PRINTED ROCKET ENGINES

X-Bow testing one of its solid fuel rocket engines. Photo via X-Bow.

By KUBI SERTOGLU

X-Bow Launch Systems, a space technology 3D printing company, has exited stealth mode this week.

Originally founded in 2016, the New Mexico-headquartered startup specializes in the development of 3D printed solid fuels and rocket motors and has already created a lineup of small launch vehicles suitable for both orbital and suborbital launches.

Having already secured several contracts with U.S. government organizations, X-Bow’s existing customers include the Air Force Research Lab, AFWERX, Los Alamos National Lab, Sandia National Lab, and the Defense Research Projects Agency(DARPA).

Jason Hundley, CEO of X-Bow, said, “X-Bow is leveraging a unique combination of technologies with an improved manufacturing model to serve existing aerospace markets and enable new ones. Our breakthrough 3D printing technology is positioned to rapidly innovate the solid propulsion and energetics markets just as SpaceX revolutionized the launch market. Our mission is to modernize solid motor production through additive manufacturing while dramatically improving unit economics.”

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japanese company serendix is 3D-printing houses in less than 24 hours

IT TOOK SERENDIX JUST 23 HOURS AND 12 MINUTES TO COMPLETE THE 3D-PRINTED HOUSE

Serendix has completed japan’s first 3D-printed house is just 23 hours and 12 minutes. the japanese company first unveiled the sphere — a 3D-printed home design — in earlier 2021, stating it could be constructed in a day for under 3 million yen (approx. $25.500 USD). a year later, the company has met its goal.

‘the skeleton weighed about 20 tons, and its assembly was completed in 3 hours,’ said the official release. ‘housing construction such as waterproofing and openings was completed in just 23 hours and 12 minutes. as a result, we achieved the development goal of serendix, which was to create a house in 24 hours.’

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Next Gen 3D Printed Catalysts To Propel Hypersonic Flight – Speeds Over 3,800 Mph

Artist’s impression of a hypersonic plane.

Ultra-efficient 3D printed catalysts could help solve the challenge of overheating in hypersonic aircraft and offer a revolutionary solution to thermal management across countless industries.

Developed by researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, the highly versatile catalysts are cost-effective to make and simple to scale.

The team’s lab demonstrations show the 3D printed catalysts could potentially be used to power hypersonic flight while simultaneously cooling the system.

The research is published in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal, Chemical Communications.

Lead researcher Dr. Selvakannan Periasamy said their work tackled one of the biggest challenges in the development of hypersonic aircraft: controlling the incredible heat that builds up when planes fly at more than five times the speed of sound.

“Our lab tests show the 3D printed catalysts we’ve developed have great promise for fuelling the future of hypersonic flight,” Periasamy said.

“Powerful and efficient, they offer an exciting potential solution for thermal management in aviation — and beyond.

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Australian surgeons turn to 3D printing to restore patients’ ankles

A specialised computer-aided design software enables the surgeons to create a customised prosthesis unique to each patient.

SYDNEY (XINHUA) – Two Australian orthopaedic surgeons have developed a 3D-printing technique to create high-tech ankle replacements.

Dr Tim O’Carrigan and Dr Mustafa Alttahir from the Limb Reconstruction Centre at the Macquarie University said their process provided “life-altering” joint replacements for patients who had suffered traumatic injuries, amputations, deformities, or arthritis.

Their breakthrough is achieved using specialised computer-aided design software which enables the surgeons to create a customised prosthesis unique to each patient.

In contrast, the traditional surgical treatment is ankle fusion, which involves removing the remaining joint cartilage and inserting screws between the bones, so the bones ultimately grow together.

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Buildings of the future could be fully 3D printed using recycled glass

CONCRETE HAS A HUGE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT. USING RECYCLED GLASS COULD HELP CURB THIS.

BY SEYED GHAFFAR MEHDI CHOUGAN AND PAWEL SIKORA 

3D printed concrete may lead to a shift in architecture and construction. Because it can be used to produce new shapes and forms that current technologies struggle with, it may change the centuries-old processes and procedures that are still used to construct buildings, resulting in lower costs and saved time.

However, concrete has a significant environmental impact. Vast quantities of natural sand are currently used to meet the world’s insatiable appetite for concrete, at great cost to the environment. In general, the construction industry struggles with sustainability. It creates around 35% of all landfill waste globally.

Our new research suggests a way to curb this impact. We have trialled using recycled glass as a component of concrete for 3D printing.

Concrete is made of a mix of cement, water, and aggregates such as sand. We trialled replacing up to 100% of the aggregate in the mix with glass. Simply put, glass is produced from sand, is easy to recycle, and can be used to make concrete without any complex processing.ADVERTISEMENT

Demand from the construction industry could also help ensure glass is recycled. In 2018 in the U.S. only a quarter of glass was recycled, with more than half going to landfill.

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House Zero brings high-end design to 3D-printed architecture

House Zero is a collaboration between Icon and prestigious US architecture firm Lake/FlatoCasey Dunn

By Adam Williams

A lot of 3D-printed architecture is focused on creating relatively simple and utilitarian structures that look functional but show little thought paid to aesthetics. However, leading 3D printing firm Icon has joined forces with prestigious studio Lake|Flato to create what they hope will become a new genre of homes that combine the benefits of 3D printing technology with the design chops of high-profile firms.

Originally unveiled back in 2021, House Zero is located in Austin, Texas, and features a modernist ranch style that’s not too dissimilar from Lake|Flato’s previous output. The interior decor is a mixture of 3D-printed curved walls, plus glass, and wood. 

It measures roughly 2,000 sq ft (185 sq m), spread over one floor and includes three bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, as well as a kitchen and central living room. Windows and doors have been carefully situated to frame choice views and maximize natural light inside. Additionally, adjacent to the main house is a smaller accessory dwelling unit that has another bedroom and bathroom.

“While the organic nature of the 3D-printed concrete and curved walls are new design languages for us, House Zero was still entirely in line with the natural connections we seek in our architecture,” said Ashley Heeren, associate at Lake|Flato. “The home expresses our shared passions for craft and performance in an inviting and comfortable family home constructed through a totally new way of building. It’s been a thrill for our team to work with Icon on such an innovative home design and be a part of the future of homebuilding.”

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CHINESE START-UP ON A MISSION TO CUT ROCKET PRODUCTION COSTS BY 80% WITH 3D PRINTING

Launcher conducts a hot fire test for its 3D-printed Engine-2 rocket engine in the E Test Complex at NASA’s Stennis Space Center.

By HAYLEY EVERETT

Chinese start-up SpaceTai has claimed its 3D printing technology is capable of slashing rocket production costs by as much as 80 percent.

Although a relatively new arrival on the space scene, SpaceTai says it can manufacture almost all its rocket parts using its self-developed 3D printers in order to cut costs. 

With its first suborbital test flight slated for 2023, the firm could potentially challenge the likes of Elon Musk’s SpaceX, Rocket Lab, Orbex, Relativity Space, and others leveraging 3D printing in the race to space in years to come. 

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Cryobioprinting could make off-the-shelf tissue-engineered structures a reality

A new cryogenic 3D printing technique could one day enable fabrication of off-the-shelf artificial muscle fibres, according to research published in Advanced Materials.

By Katie Fegan

Printing synthetic tissue that mimics the structure of muscle remains a major challenge in tissue engineering. Muscle fibres are anisotropic, meaning that their physical properties, including the ability to transmit mechanical forces, are direction dependent. Introducing a temperature gradient during the fabrication process, from sub-zero temperatures upwards, is a simple way of creating tissue scaffolds with anisotropic microscale pores. However, the freezing process is harmful to cells encapsulated within the scaffold.

Enter cryobioprinting: an all-in-one fabrication and preservation technique developed by scientists at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Cryobioprinting combines a customized freezing plate with cryoprotected bioinks to produce cell-laden structures with anisotropic microchannels. The scaffolds can be stored in liquid nitrogen for several months and revived on demand, a feature that would allow pre-made products to be used in a clinical setting.

“Cryobioprinting can give bioprinted tissue an extended shelf life and allows convenient transport of tissue between sites, which is something conventional bioprinting methods do not readily enable,” says senior author Y Shrike Zhang. “[Cryobioprinting] may have broad application in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, drug discovery and personalized therapeutics.”

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UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND INVESTIGATES 3D PRINTING FOR FUTURE OF PERSONALIZED MEDICINE

Spritam, the world’s first FDA-approved 3D printed drug.

By HAYLEY EVERETT 

Researchers at the University of Queensland (UG) have published a new paper exploring 3D printing’s role in the future of personalized medicine for patients.

According to pharmacist, UQ PhD student and lead author of the study Liam Krueger, the technology is refined enough to accurately print specialized dosages onsite in hospitals and pharmacies in coming years. Through the study, the researchers are hoping to accelerate the advancement of 3D printed pharmaceuticals within Australia and beyond.

“3D printing is regularly used in other medical settings such as dentistry to create implants, however the utilization of the technology is lagging in the pharmaceutical space,” said Krueger.

“WITH THIS RESEARCH WE ARE HOPING TO GAIN MORE MOMENTUM FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THIS TECHNOLOGY WHICH WOULD BE AN INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY FOR THE FUTURE OF THE AUSTRALIAN PHARMACEUTICAL LANDSCAPE.”

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