New device captures ambient energy from the air to power small electronic devices

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Professor Manos Tentzeris displays an inkjet-printed rectifying antenna used to convert microwave energy to DC power.

Researchers have found a way to capture and harness energy transmitted by such sources as radio and television transmitters, cell phone networks and satellite communications systems. By getting this ambient energy from the air around us, the technique could provide a new way to power networks of wireless sensors, microprocessors and communications chips.

 

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Nokia Developing A Cell Phone That Never Needs Recharging

Nokia Developing A Cell Phone That Never Needs Recharging

Nokia hopes to create a device that could harvest enough power to keep a cell phone topped up. 

A cell phone that never needs recharging might sound too good to be true, but Nokia says it’s developing technology that could draw enough power from ambient radio waves to keep a cell-phone handset topped up.

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Intelligent Bridge Monitoring System To Prevent Tragedies

Intelligent Bridge Monitoring System To Prevent Tragedies

Smart bridges will know when they are in trouble 

From mundane traffic overpasses to marvelous feats of soaring engineering, bridges are something we tend to take for granted – until something goes wrong that is. A team from the University of Michigan is leading a five-year, $19 million project to engineer an intelligent infrastructure monitoring system designed to prevent tragedies like the collapse of the Interstate 35 West bridge over the Mississippi river in 2007 in which 13 people were killed and 145 were injured.

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Faster Wireless to Compete with Speed of Fiber

Faster Wireless to Compete with Speed of Fiber

 Researchers at Battelle used off-the-shelf optical telecommunication
components to create a faster millimeter-wave device.

There’s no shortage of demand for faster wireless, but today’s fastest technologies–Wi-Fi, 3G cellular networks, and even the upcoming WiMax–max out at tens or hundreds of megabits per second. So far, no commercial wireless system can beat the raw speed of optical fiber, which can carry tens of gigabits per second.

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