Which U.S. cities have the most families with kids?

A man carries a young boy on his shoulders while walking inside Central Park as the colors of autumn become more prevalent in New York

Spoiler alert: It’s simply not the case that families with kids have disappeared from urban America.

Look around a hip neighborhood in Lower Manhattan or downtown San Francisco, and you’ll see lots of young people, and Baby Boomers whose kids have left the nest. There are also some stylish moms (or nannies) pushing tots in strollers. But you won’t see many traditional nuclear families with school-age children.

There’s a growing consensus that our cities are becoming “childless.” This past October, Axios ran a story on the ”great family exodus,” showing data that the share of families with children under the age of 20 has fallen in 53 large cities across the country. As far as I can tell, the phrase “childless cities” was first advanced in 2013 by Joel Kotkin in an essay of that title for City Journal.

Several factors are said to be pushing families with kids out of cities: the expensiveness of city living; the lagging performance of urban versus suburban public schools; and the preference of immigrant families for the suburbs over urban locations. But just how childless are our cities, really?

Continue reading… “Which U.S. cities have the most families with kids?”

0

Are reported high rates of childlessness a myth?

Reported high rates of childlessness fail to take into account fertility treatments, adoptions and the simple delay of childbirth.

Recent reports of the rise of childlessness are premature. As with fertility dynamics generally, the phenomenon has many parts. The reports may prove true in the long term, or they may not—but it’s too soon to tell.

 

 

Continue reading… “Are reported high rates of childlessness a myth?”

0

1 in 5 American Women in Their Early 40’s are Childless

childless

Number of childless women in their early 40’s has risen sharply since the 1970’s.

Nearly one in five American women in her early 40s is childless, according to a report that shows a striking increase in women who don’t have biological children.  The trend was much less common in the 1970s, when one in 10 women did not have children by 40 to 44, the age bracket researchers use to designate the end of childbearing years.

0