There may not be as much as you think in a college degree

What you can’t typically get from online study—yet—is a degree from a reputable and accredited university.

“You just spent 150 grand on an education you could have gotten for $1.50 in late fees at the public library.”  That is one of Matt Damon’s best lines in Good Will Hunting when he chastised a book smart scholar.

 

 

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College degrees are now accessible to anyone with a computer with UniversityNow

Gene Wade, CEO and founder of UniversityNow.

UniversityNow is receiving $20.4 million in funding to bring U.S. education out of a “code red.”UniversityNow is building a network of accredited, online universitieswhere students earn undergraduate and graduate degrees at a low cost and in a flexible environment. Its goal is to make higher education more affordable and accessible for people everywhere through the intelligent use of technology.

 

 

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Here’s what you might have missed about the U.S. jobs report

Like the unemployment rate, the employment-population ratio is also affected by labor participation.

The US jobs report last week added to a long string of lackluster monthly installments of data, but at least one thing has been looking up: The unemployment rate is ticking down steadily, dropping almost a tenth of a percentage point with each new report.

 

 

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College enrollment declined in 2012, but for good reasons

Ninety percent of the overall decline in enrollment was from students over 25.

For the first time in six years the number of college students has declined, according to new Census figures released this week. The half-a-million-student drop is “a huge decline,” Census Bureau statistician Julie Siebens told me. This sounds like bad news, but it could actually be a sign of good news. It means the labor market is — slowly, but surely — getting better.

 

 

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It all comes down to money when picking a college and major

Nearly half of adults are limiting their child’s college choices based on price.

Families are cost-cutting before their kids even apply to schools because of the financial burden of paying for college. According to a new survey by Discover Student Loans, And it’s affecting students’ decisions about not only where to go, but what to study.

 

 

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15 innovations that will alter the face of higher education

High schools, community colleges, and four-year institutions will create early-college/dual-degree courses better aligned to the college curriculum.

The higher education landscape has been profoundly transformed in roughly 50-year intervals. During the early 19th century, the colonial colleges were joined by several hundred more religiously founded institutions. The mid-19th century saw the rise of public colleges, culminating in the Morrill Act of 1862. The turn of the 20th century witnessed the emergence of the modern research university as well as the articulation of the Wisconsin Idea, that public universities should serve the public, as well as the appearance of extension services. The 1960s saw the transformation of normal schools into comprehensive universities, the rapid proliferation of community colleges, the end of legal segregation in higher education, and sharply increased federal aid to colleges and universities.

 

 

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Value of a college degree in China – $44

Job fair in China for college graduates.

College students in the U.S. facing the misery of an anemic post-graduation job market have company in an unlikely-seeming place: China. Despite entering a robust economy that seemed to weather the financial crisis as if were it a middling squall, China’s college graduates on average make only 300 yuan, or roughly $44, more per month than the average Chinese migrant worker, according to statistics cited over the weekend by a top Chinese labor researcher and reported today by the Beijing Times (in Chinese).

 

 

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The Chinese skills disconnect may be an opportunity for us

Business in China are swamped with job applications from college graduates but have few jobs to offer.

The headline in he New York Times read “Degrees, but No Guarantees.” However, the story was not about the students graduating from American universities this season. Instead, it was about Chinese grads. Chinese businesses are swamped by job applications from graduating students but have few jobs to offer. As bad as our economy seems for our own grads, their prospects are better than China’s.

 

 

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