IBM unveils ‘world’s smallest computer’ with blockchain at Think 2018

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If there’s one downside to powerful computers, it’s that they’re too damn big.

Luckily, that’s about to change. At least, if IBM has anything to say about it.

March 19 is the first day of IBM Think 2018, the company’s flagship conference, where the company will unveil what it claims is the world’s smallest computer. They’re not kidding: It’s literally smaller than a grain of salt.

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Futurework – how technology will redefine the culture of work

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“We’re increasingly going to be working with technology, and clearly some technologies are going to replace us.”

Former Secretary of Labor and professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, Robert Reich and Susan Hassler, editor in chief of IEEE Spectrum magazine, Susan Hassler , are joined by engineers, scientists, and futurists from MIT, Carnegie Mellon, Rice University, and the Institute for the Future to give listeners insights into how technology will redefine work in the not too distant future. (Podcast)

 

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Could ‘solid’ light compute previously unsolvable problems?

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Princeton University researchers have begun crystallizing light as part of an effort to answer fundamental questions about the physics of matter. The researchers are not shining light through crystal – they are transforming light intocrystal.

 

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Educational technology is making achievement gaps bigger between rich and poor

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Poor kids don’t receive as much guidance in a library as affluent kids do.

“The Badlands” is the local name for the Philadelphia neighborhood of Kennsington. The neighborhood is pockmarked with empty lots and burned-out row houses, the area has an unemployment rate of 29 percent and a poverty rate of 90 percent. The neighborhood of Chestnut Hill is just a few miles to the northwest of Kennsington but seems to belong to a different universe. In Chestnut Hill, educated professionals shop the boutiques along Germantown Avenue and return home to gracious stone and brick houses, the average price of which hovers above $400,000.