Each post on Facebook seen by a third of friends

Each post is seen by one in three Facebook “friends.”

Do you know who saw the picture you posted on Facebook or what you posted on your timeline?  More of your Facebook “friends” saw what you posted than the average Facebook user realizes, according to a study done by data scientists at Facebook.

 

 

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U.S. is the most data hungry country according to Twitter’s Transparency Report

“These growing inquiries can have a serious chilling effect on free expression – and real privacy implications.”

The Government wants more of your data, but copyright holders are getting slightly less active in requesting tweettakedowns. The social/news/media network published its second Twitter Transparency Report today in conjunction with #DataPrivacyDay. Twitter’s goal is to be open about revealing how many government requests it gets for user information and DMCA copyright takedowns. Its first Transparency Report was published seven months ago, in July.

 

 

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Less than 1% of the world’s data is analyzed, over 80% is unprotected: Study

The study finds that 0.5% of global data is analyzed, and just half of data requiring security measures is protected.

In 2012, the global data supply reached 2.8 zettabytes (ZB) – or 2.8 trillion GB – but just 0.5% of this is used for analysis, according to the Digital Universe Study.

 

 

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The data crunchers who helped Obama win the election

Obama’s data crunchers.

The backroom data crunchers who powered Barack Obama’s campaign to victory noticed last spring that George Clooney had an almost gravitational tug on West Coast females ages 40 to 49. The women were far and away the single demographic group most likely to hand over cash, for a chance to dine in Hollywood with Clooney — and Obama.

 

 

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How Satyamev Jayate, India’s favorite TV show uses data to change the world

The show analyzes the millions of messages they receive on controversial issues to do everything from planning future episodes to pushing for political change.

In India every Sunday morning millions of people in India tune in to watch Bollywood star Aamir Khan host one of the country’s highest-rated television shows, Satyamev Jayate. Only unlike so many popular programs, Satyamev Jayate doesn’t involve a singing competition or a collection of volatile strangers living under the same roof. It’s a documentary program tackling some of the country’s most-sensitive topics, and it has the whole country — indeed, the whole world — talking. In order to funnel millions of messages a week into something valuable, the shows producers have turned to big data. (video)

 

 

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When big data meets broadband

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Scientists want to build a telescope capable of taking roughly 1,400 photos of the night sky consisting of 6 gigabytes of information each somewhere in the mountains in Chile. The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope would result in several hundreds of petabytes of processed data each year. This month the National Science Board will decide if it should fund the next phase of LSST to build that data-generating telescope.

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What Facebook knows about us and what will it do with all that data?

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Facebook’s insights on human behavior can give them new ways to cash in on our data—and remake our view of society.

Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, has said in public that if Facebook were a country its 900 million members would make it the third largest country in the world.

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How Private Is Your DNA?

DNA privacy

How is my DNA NOT private?

Unlike the contents of your inbox, bank statement, or Facebook timeline, your DNA quite literally defines you. It’s strange, then, that in an age where sequencing the genome is becoming trivial, we don’t give a second thought about the privacy issues surrounding the chemicals that make us who we are.

In fact, most states in the US have absolutely no laws whatsoever to govern surreptitious genetic testing. If that surprises you, it gets worse. Back in 2006, the particularly forward-thinking state of Minnesota passed a law demanding that written consent had to be obtained for collection, storage, use, and sharing of genetic information. In 2011, however, the Minnesota Supreme Court judged that the state’s own department of health was in violation of that very law.

So, quite literally millions of US citizen have their DNA records stored on databases, and there are few laws governing what’s done with the data. Something has to be done about that—but it’s not necessarily as easy as it sounds.

Clamp down on DNA privacy…

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IBM creates a bit of data using only 12 iron atoms

Letter S

Miniaturized information storage in atomic-scale antiferromagnets. The binary representation of the letter ‘S’ (01010011) was stored in the Neel states of eight iron atom arrays.

After five years of work, IBM announced on Thursday that its researchers have been able to reduce from about one million to 12 the number of atoms required to create a bit of data. (video)

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