Up to half of developers work remotely; here’s who’s hiring them

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Forty-five percent of developers work remotely at least part of the time – why not? Glassdoor and Remotive have compiled lists of employers actively hiring remote IT workers.

One of the great things about technology work is that it doesn’t really matter where it’s performed. You’re on the network, with minimum latency, regardless if you’re down the hall or on another continent. For employees, working from home — or from a remote office — means greater flexibility and reduced stress from commutes. For employers — and this is extremely important in the IT field — it means being able to draw from a vast, global pool of talent, with no concerns about relocation. In addition, work could even be handed off from time zone to time zone for more rapid turnarounds.

It is estimated that there are between 18 to 21 million developers across the globe. Of this, only about one million — or five percent — are in the United States, so you can see how an employer in the US, or anywhere else for that matter, needs to spread its recruiting and staffing wings.

It’s in the best interest for tech-oriented employers, then, to be open to this global pool of talent. There are a number of companies leading the way, actively hiring globally distributed tech workforces. Glassdoor recently published a list of leading companies that encourage remote work, which includes some prominent tech companies, and Remotive has been compiling a comprehensive list of more than 2,500 companies of all sizes that hire remote IT workers.

Survey data from Stack Overflow, analyzed by Itoro Ikon, finds that out of almost 89,000 developers participating in its most recent survey, 45% work remotely at least part of the time, and 10% indicated they are full-time remote workers. A majority of remote workers, 58%, are regular full-time employees.

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App developers giving up on Google Glass before it even launches

google glass

Nine of the 16 app Glass app makers admitted they’d abandoned their efforts.

A little over a year and a half ago, Google Chairman Eric Schmidt said he found having to talk to Google Glass out loud “the weirdest thing” and admitted that there would be “places where Google Glass are inappropriate.” The average person could have told Google this long before they spent millions developing Google Glass.

 

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The video game industry is growing 4 times faster than the U.S. economy

game industry

An Electronic Arts employee works on a character for “MySims.”

The U.S. economy is on the upswing. Unemployment is down to 5.8 percent, and we’re adding hundreds of thousands of new jobs every months — and the video game industry is partially responsible for that.

 

 

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The rapidly changing world of IT sparks a war for developers

tug of war

War for developers

The emergence of next-generation social, mobile, analytics and cloud technology has sparked a war for developers able to continue the fast pace of innovation. Enterprises that want to remain in business tomorrow would be wise to make the right changes today.

 

 

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Why rent is so expensive in cities: Parking spaces

underground parking

Underground parking is extremely expensive to build.

Many factors contribute to drive up the price of rents, but parking is among the most significant, according to University of California Los Angeles professor and renowned parking guru Donald Shoup. During the CityLab 2014 conference in Los Angeles last week BuzzFeed News sat down with Shoup to talk about how parking makes housing more expensive. His point: “It’s unfair to have cities where parking is free for cars and housing is expensive for people.”

 

 

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There’s a shortage of software developers – tell your kids to become coders

kids-coding

Companies can’t find enough coders.

Alibaba has gone public in a $25 billion deal. Now an avalanche of IPOs may follow. It is rumored that dozens of disruptive mobile, cloud, network systems and biotech companies are ready to tap public markets. Even before Alibaba, about 190 companies had raised $40 billion in 2014, a 40% increase from last year, according to a recent report from Renaissance Capital. Investors who remember the dot-com days of 1999 may cringe at the thought of a deluge of IPOs. But it may be a sign of vigor.

 

 

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Top 7 blogs a student programmer should really read

learn to code

The top 7 blogs will come in handy and boost your skills up a few notches.

You need to immerse yourself in the programming culture if you want to succeed as a programmer. This is more true if you’re still a student. The field of programming is so broad and there’s so much information to absorb that you’ll never come out on top if you participate from a distance. Fortunately, blogs are a readily accessible medium keep you in the loop.

 

 

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Neurogaming trends are revolutionize the gaming industry

neurogaming

Neurogaming is where the mind and body meet game-play.

New gaming platforms, segments, and technologies are being introduced and adopted faster than ever before – sometimes more rapidly than we can grasp their full potential. There are some exciting times ahead in the neurogaming ecosystem.

 

 

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Github doubled its repositories from 5 million to 10 million in 2013

GitHub hosts millions of developers’ repositories in the cloud.

For those of you new to the coding world, Github has become the goto place in the cloud where developers store their code. For many, it has become the replacement for traditional resumes, because prospective employers can view their latest projects in great detail.

Less than a year ago, in January, GitHub was closing in on the 5 million repos* milestone. Today, the company announced it’s hosting 10 million repos and counting. (”Repo” is short for “repository.” “Repository” is where your code lives. GitHub hosts millions of developers’ repositories in the cloud, where they can be shared globally and accessed from anywhere.)

 

 

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Developing apps for wearable computing poses new challenges for developers

There will be a job market for wearable computer developers and engineers.

Developers are still learning how to use Google Glass. The Glass Development Kit is expected to be unveiled shortly and will build on the Android toolkits that a small but growing developer community is learning their way around the platform. But there are unique challenges for wearable computer software creation. How do you create apps for a wearable computer that lacks a mouse, a keyboard, and a touchscreen? How do you create programs for a hybrid of glasses and a computer that depends on a voice interface and a single button? It creates challenges.

 

 

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