This former semiconductor factory is now the worlds largest indoor farm, producing 10k heads of lettuce per day

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This indoor Japanese farm uses LED lights and hydroponics to produce lettuce 2.5 times faster, with just 1% of the water, when compared to an outdoor farm.

When we think about factories, and what we decry as “factory farms,” we probably don’t think very highly of them as being a key component in the future of agriculture, but if we can take what factories do best, such as use technology to build efficient production lines, and pair that with what nature does best, which is growing biomass from light and water and minerals, then growing food in plant factories starts to make a lot of sense.

Converting what were formerly industrial buildings into indoor farming operations, especially in urban areas and locations that aren’t conducive to year-round outdoor food production, could be an excellent reuse of existing resources (the buildings themselves, the infrastructure that supports them, and their locations in or near cities) to help build a more sustainable food system. And this sort of operation can be done in a way that’s both highly efficient and productive (PDF), in essence turning our ideas about industrial-scale factory farming on their heads.

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Chef’s Farm – a vending machine that grows 20,000 heads of lettuce a year without sunlight

Lettuce vending machine

After a nuclear holocaust has blocked out the sun or rampaging zombies have taken over our farmland there is finally a device that will guarantee we can still grow vegetables in the dark. This Japanese lettuce-growing vending machinet doesn’t require sunlight (it uses fluorescent bulbs) and it can churn out a surprising yield of  lettuce: 60 heads a day, or over 20,000 a year.

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