Don’t drop your diet yet, but scientists have discovered how CRISPR can burn fat

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A personalized therapy for metabolic conditions that are linked to obesity could involve removing a small amount of a person’s fat, transforming it into an energy-burning variation using CRISPR gene-editing, and then re-implanting it into the body, according to researchers from the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

In tests involving mice, the implanted human fat cells helped lower sugar concentrations in the blood and decrease fat in the liver. When the mice were put on a high-fat diet, the ones that had been implanted with the human beige fat only gained half as much weight as those that had been implanted with regular human fat.

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Innovation in Medicine through tiny sensors

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A professor of ophthalmology at the University of California San Francisco, Sretavan treats nerve damage related to glaucoma, a disease that’s the leading cause of irreversible blindness. It affects approximately 70 million people worldwide.

Glaucoma is a complex eye disease without a direct cause. Physicians measure pressure inside the eye to assess glaucoma risk. But that pressure normally fluctuates over time and there’s no easy way to measure pressure regularly, especially for elderly patients who often have a hard time making it to his office. Continue reading… “Innovation in Medicine through tiny sensors”

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MetaMed – data driven personalized medicine

MetaMed provides “evidence based medicine.”

Going to your usual doctor may not be enough for someone who has a persistent medical problem.  They need to know more than their physician can tell them, and they need to know it soon.  MetaMed is a new company that provides a personalized medical research service.  The company is backed by Peter Theil and Jaan Tallinn.

 

 

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Revolution in personalized medicine is coming

The need for personalized therapies abound.

It is the dawn of a new age of personalized medicine.  The interpretation of the human genome will transform medicine.   We are moving into the data-driven medicine of tomorrow.  Soon, diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and most importantly, prevention will be tailored to individuals’ genetic and phenotypic information.

 

 

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New Form of Insulin Can Be Inhaled Rather Than Injected

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This new, quick acting insulin inhaler uses a powder (AFREZZA™) to deliver the medication.

Scientists have described a new ultra-rapid acting mealtime insulin (AFREZZA™) that is orally inhaled for absorption via the lung. Because the insulin is absorbed so rapidly, AFREZZA’s profile closely mimics the normal early insulin response seen in healthy individuals. AFREZZA is awaiting approval by the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This presentation took place at the 239th American Chemical Society National Meeting, being held in San Francisco, California, USA March 21-25.

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What Makes You Unique? Not Genes So Much as Surrounding Sequences, Study Finds

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Researchers have found that the unique, specific changes among individuals in the sequence of DNA affect the ability of “control proteins” called transcription factors to bind to the regions that control gene expression.

The key to human individuality may lie not in our genes, but in the sequences that surround and control them, according to new research by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Yale University. The interaction of those sequences with a class of key proteins, called transcription factors, can vary significantly between two people and are likely to affect our appearance, our development and even our predisposition to certain diseases, the study found.

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Minor Variations in One Gene May Be Associated With Endurance Running

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Elite endurance athletes were more likely to have variations of the NRF2 gene than elite sprinters.

A few minor variations in one gene may make a difference in athletic endurance, according to a new study from Physiological Genomics.

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Southern African Genomes Sequenced: Benefits for Human Health Expected

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This image shows a group of hunters from the Ju/’hoansi tribe in the Namibian Bush.

Human genomes from Southern African Bushmen and Bantu individuals have been sequenced by a team of scientists seeking a greater understanding of human genetic variation and its effect on human health. The study’s findings will be published in the journal Nature on 18 February 2010. The research was completed by scientists from American, African, and Australian research institutions, with support from Penn State University in the United States and from several U.S. companies that market DNA-sequencing instruments.

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Some Morbidly Obese People Are Missing Genes, Shows New Research

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A small but significant proportion of morbidly obese people are missing a section of their DNA, according to new research.

A small but significant proportion of morbidly obese people are missing a section of their DNA, according to research published February 3 in Nature. The authors of the study, from Imperial College London and ten other European Centres, say that missing DNA such as that identified in this research may be having a dramatic effect on some people’s weight.

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‘Longevity Gene’ Helps Prevent Memory Decline and Dementia

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Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that a “longevity gene” helps to slow age-related decline in brain function in older adults. Drugs that mimic the gene’s effect are now under development, the researchers note, and could help protect against Alzheimer’s disease.

Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found that a “longevity gene” helps to slow age-related decline in brain function in older adults. Drugs that mimic the gene’s effect are now under development, the researchers note, and could help protect against Alzheimer’s disease.

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Long-Term Physical Activity Has an Anti-Aging Effect at the Cellular Level

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New research shows that physical exercise by professional athletes leads to activation of the important enzyme telomerase and stabilizes the telomere

Intensive exercise prevented shortening of telomeres, a protective effect against aging of the cardiovascular system, according to research reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Gene Therapy Can Improve Muscle Mass and Strength in Monkeys, Research Suggests

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Cynomolgus macaque. New research in these primates suggests that a gene delivery strategy that produces follistatin can improve muscle mass and function.

A study appearing in Science Translational Medicine puts scientists one step closer to clinical trials to test a gene delivery strategy to improve muscle mass and function in patients with certain degenerative muscle disorders.

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