How to build a ‘rest ethic’ that is as strong as your work one

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The authors of a new book offer creative and thoughful ways to maximize your time off that will gift you with inspiration, ideas, and recovery.

Take in a deep breath and hold it. Keep holding. How long can you hold your inhale until it gets uncomfortable? Thirty seconds? A few minutes? It doesn’t take long until we all, eventually, need to exhale.

Think of your work ethic as the inhale (it is, in a way, as essential to your career as air is to your body). With a good work ethic, we make, execute, coordinate, manage, fulfill, and get things done. Task list—inhale. Project execution—inhale. Making our ideas come to life—inhale. But we can’t keep inhaling forever. Eventually we have to exhale. This exhale is your rest ethic, and it is just as essential.

A solid rest ethic gifts us inspiration, ideas, and recovery. It allows us to build up our enthusiasm and sustain our passion. Gaining a fresh perspective—exhale. Project ideation and “aha” moments—exhale. Letting big ideas incubate in your mind—exhale. And just as a deep exhale prepares you for a better inhale, your rest ethic enables you to have a better work ethic.

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Income flowing to the top 1% is at a record high

The economic recovery belongs to the rich. It seemed ominous in 2007 when the share of national income flowing to America’s top 1% of earners reached 18.3%: the highest since just before the crash of 1929. But whereas the Depression kicked off a long era of even income growth the rich have done much better this time round.

 

 

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Smart policies are good, but oil is better

How Texas and North Dakota won the recovery.

If you want to understand how to create hundreds of thousands jobs at once you just need look to Texas and North Dakota. Together, these two states account for a little more than 8 percent of the country’s population — about one in 12 people. But they’re also responsible for 20 percent of net new jobs since the end of the recession. And, crucially, they account for “more than 100 percent of the increase in U.S. [oil] production since 2009,” James Hamilton writes.

 

 

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The wealth we lost and regained since the recession started in 2007

We have recovered less than half of what we’ve lost in wealth.

Households in the United States lost roughly $16 trillion in net worth since the recession started in 2007. According to the latest Fed data, we regained about $14.6 trillion, or roughly 91 percent, of it. But let’s not break out the champagne glasses just yet.

 

 

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Are student loans wrecking the economy?

Student debt is a dangerous bubble that is piling unprecedented levels of debt on young people.

Houses and cars power recoveries. And young people aren’t buying either. That’s a New York Fed study conclusion and that can be easily read as blaming student debt for holding back the recovery by squashing home and auto sales.

 

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Extended unemployment benefits are set to expire in 2012, will this be the next big hit to the economy?

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The total impact of the extended unemployment benefits on the economy is huge, because so many Americans are currently taking advantage of them.

The economic recovery could be headed for a major hit that will leave it even weaker as extended unemployment benefits are set to expire in 2012.

 

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Jobs Are Back Just Not For the Middle-Aged Worker

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Jobs are back. Just not for everybody.

Like many other things in the stutter-step economic recovery, the job market is finally recovering, but progress is uneven and some people are being left out. The latest jobs report, for example, shows that the economy created 216,000 jobs in March, for a total of about 1.9 million new jobs since employment levels bottomed out at the end of 2009. That’s a healthy pace of job growth that will help bring down the uncomfortably high unemployment rate, and, with luck, cement the recovery.

 

 

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Big Companies Amassing Record Cash Reserves as the Economy Picks Up

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Fed-Ex reported higher profits in its most recent quarter.

Some experts say the strength of the largest firms will be key as the recovery strengthens. Others worry that the giants’ clout has grown at workers’ expense.  The brutal recession has left many American families, small businesses and state and local governments in financial ruin or teetering on the brink.

But it’s a much different story for the nation’s biggest companies. Many have emerged from the economy’s harrowing downturn loaded with cash, thanks to deep cost-cutting that helped drive unemployment into double digits.

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Can Twitter Fix an Economy in Crisis?

Can Twitter Fix an Economy in Crisis?

In search of a future for Brentwood, CA … and the U.S. work force

Raymond Alvarez:  Earthquakes, a great flood, fires – seemingly nothing could stop the rocking ’90s and California’s Contra Costa County, an area bounded by high tech companies to the south and industrial giants in the north.

Then came the fourth horseman of the apocalypse, the real estate bust.

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