Artificial skin spun from spider silk

golden-spider-on-web

Spider silk could be an ideal answer for helping heal wounds.

Researchers may have found a better alternative for providing skin grafts to wounds.  It turns out that spider silk is legendary for its strength, as well as its possible healing properties. Tissue engineer Hanna Wendt at Medical School Hannover in Germany honed in on this and found that by creating an artificial skin spun from spider silk, we could have an ideal answer for helping heal wounds.

0

Giant Spider Weaves Web of Super Strength Never Before Seen

giantspiders 1

Caerostris darwini, a giant orb spider and namesake of Charles Darwin, weaves a web of tremendous strength and size.

The antithesis of the itsy-bitsy spider, Caerostris darwini, a giant orb spider and namesake of Charles Darwin, weaves a web of super strength never before seen, says Dr. Todd Blackledge, Leuchtag Endowed Chair at The University of Akron.

 

Continue reading… “Giant Spider Weaves Web of Super Strength Never Before Seen”

0

An Implantable Biosensor Could Alert Doctors to Signs of Disease

silk biosensor

A biosensor made from silk and gold can pick up tiny signals from proteins and chemicals in the body.

Silk and gold, usually a pairing for the runways of Milan, are now the main ingredients for a new kind of implantable biosensor. Researchers at Tufts University have crafted a small antenna from liquid silk and micropatterned gold. The antenna is designed to spot specific proteins and chemicals in the body, and alert doctors wirelessly to signs of disease. Scientists say the implant could someday help patients with diabetes track their glucose levels without having to test themselves daily.

 

Continue reading… “An Implantable Biosensor Could Alert Doctors to Signs of Disease”

0

Scientists Incorporate Spider’s Silk-Spinning Genes Into Goats

goatsilk

Goats that produce spider silk protein in their milk could enable researchers to collect large quantities of the silk.

Researchers from the University of Wyoming have developed a way to incorporate spiders’ silk-spinning genes into goats, allowing the researchers to harvest the silk protein from the goats’ milk for a variety of applications. For instance, due to its strength and elasticity, spider silk fiber could have several medical uses, such as for making artificial ligaments and tendons, for eye sutures, and for jaw repair. The silk could also have applications in bulletproof vests and improved car airbags.

 

Continue reading… “Scientists Incorporate Spider’s Silk-Spinning Genes Into Goats”

0

New Tiny Silk Brain Implants

r2131
Brain saving silk implants
Medical researchers have developed tiny electrodes from silk and thin sheets of metal that can be surgically implanted on the brain. They can gather data and send out electrical signals without causing damage to the patient:

“These implants have the potential to maximize the contact between electrodes and brain tissue, while minimizing damage to the brain,” said Dr. Walter Koroshetz of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes of Health, which helped pay for the study.

“They could provide a platform for a range of devices with applications in epilepsy, spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders.”

Continue reading… “New Tiny Silk Brain Implants”

0