Socially aware algorithms are ready to help

C51615CE-843C-44C4-BC33-0EFAC4294A2C

Better coding, not just laws and regulations, is the solution for tech’s failure to address the needs of actual humans

Calls for stronger government regulation of large technology companies have become increasingly urgent and ubiquitous. But many of the technology failures we hear about every day—including fake news; privacy violations; discrimination; and filter bubbles that amplify online isolation and confrontation—have algorithmic failures at their core.

For problems that are primarily algorithmic in nature, human oversight of outcomes is insufficient. We cannot expect, for example, armies of regulators to check for discriminatory online advertising in real time. Fortunately, there are algorithmic improvements that companies can and should adopt now, without waiting for regulation to catch up.

Given their frequent media portrayal as mysterious black boxes, we might be worried that rogue algorithms have escaped the abilities of their creators to understand and rein in their behaviors. The reality is thankfully not so dire. In recent years hundreds of scientists in machine learning, artificial intelligence and related fields have been working hard at what we call socially aware algorithm design. Many of the most prominent and damaging algorithmic failures are well understood (at least in hindsight), and, furthermore, have algorithmic solutions.

Continue reading… “Socially aware algorithms are ready to help”

0

The new digital divide is between people who opt out of algorithms and people who don’t

D2A2333B-DF46-4E7A-8381-17F40216FF50

Every aspect of life can be guided by artificial intelligence algorithms—from choosing what route to take for your morning commute, to deciding whom to take on a date, to complex legal and judicial matters such as predictive policing.

Big tech companies like Google and Facebook use AI to obtain insights on their gargantuan trove of detailed customer data. This allows them to monetize users’ collective preferences through practices such as micro-targeting, a strategy used by advertisers to narrowly target specific sets of users.

In parallel, many people now trust platforms and algorithms more than their own governments and civic society. An October 2018 study suggested that people demonstrate “algorithm appreciation,” to the extent that they would rely on advice more when they think it is from an algorithm than from a human.

Continue reading… “The new digital divide is between people who opt out of algorithms and people who don’t”

0

Google just launched new AI-powered algorithms

A-Kristian-Bocsi-Bloomberg-Getty-Images-1200x514

Search engine now returns answers instead of just links.

Training The Network

Today, if you ask the Google search engine on your desktop a question like “How big is the Milky Way,” you’ll no longer just get a list of links where you could find the answer — you’ll get the answer: “100,000 light years.”

While this question/answer tech may seem simple enough, it’s actually a complex development rooted in Google’s powerful deep neural networks. These networks are a form of artificial intelligence that aims to mimic how human brains work, relating together bits of information to comprehend data and predict patterns.

Continue reading… “Google just launched new AI-powered algorithms”

0

Automation, New Morality and a ‘Global Useless Class’

LONDON — What will our future look like — not in a century but in a mere two decades?

Terrifying, if you’re to believe Yuval Noah Harari, the Israeli historian and author of “Sapiens” and “Homo Deus,” a pair of audacious books that offer a sweeping history of humankind and a forecast of what lies ahead: an age of algorithms and technology that could see us transformed into “super-humans” with godlike qualities.

Continue reading… “Automation, New Morality and a ‘Global Useless Class’”

0

Computers know what you’re thinking with emotion recognition algorithms

emotion

There were plenty of skeptics who didn’t think a list of links could ever turn a profit when Google was first getting started. That was before advertising came along and gave Google a way to pay its bills. Thanks in part to that fortuitous accident, in today’s Internet market, advertising isn’t just an also-ran with new technologies: Marketers are bending innovation to their needs as startups chase prospective revenue streams.

 

 

Continue reading… “Computers know what you’re thinking with emotion recognition algorithms”

0

High-frequency trading faster than the speed of reality

Machines for High Frequency Trading (HFT)

On April 23 at 1:07 pm, a hijacked AP Twitter account falsely reported an attack on the White House. Just seconds later, major US stock indexes started to fall. They were down 1 percent by the time the tweet was publicly identified as bogus three minutes later. And in another three minutes, the markets had recovered to pre-tweet levels.

 

 

Continue reading… “High-frequency trading faster than the speed of reality”

0

Are algorithms better storytellers than human journalists?

Articles don’t read like robots wrote them.

Narrative Science has developed an algorithm that produces a computer-written news story about every 30 seconds, Wired reports. The articles run on the websites of respected publishers like Forbes, as well as other Internet media powers (many of which are keeping their identities private).

 

 

Continue reading… “Are algorithms better storytellers than human journalists?”

0

Robotic Weather Planes Could Improve Weather Forecasts

Robotic Weather Planes Could Improve Weather Forecasts 

 Small, unmanned aerial vehicles, such as this 18-kilogram Boeing ScanEagle, could provide more precise data about weather systems.

Weather forecasters may not have the best reputation for accuracy, but with today’s computational modeling, it’s possible to make pretty reliable weather predictions up to 48 hours in advance. Researchers at MIT, however, believe that autonomous aircraft running smart storm-chasing algorithms could get that figure up to four days. Better weather forecasting could help farmers and transportation authorities with planning and even save lives by providing earlier warnings about storms and severe weather, says Jonathan How, principal investigator at MIT’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Continue reading… “Robotic Weather Planes Could Improve Weather Forecasts”

0

Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors

Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors 

A portable, noninvasive monitor developed by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. 

Patients with severe injuries or serious infections run the risk of circulatory shock–a life-threatening condition in which the blood can’t supply tissues with enough oxygen and nutrients. If shock is recognized in time, the patient can be resuscitated with oxygen, intravenous fluids, and medications. But catching shock early is no simple matter. A small infrared sensor currently under development at the University of Massachusetts Medical School promises to detect impending shock earlier than any other noninvasive test.

Continue reading… “Portable, Noninvasive Trauma Monitors”

0