Record Numbers of College Students Are Seeking Treatment for Depression and Anxiety — But Schools Can’t Keep Up

 

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Not long after Nelly Spigner arrived at the University of Richmond in 2014 as a Division I soccer player and aspiring surgeon, college began to feel like a pressure cooker. Overwhelmed by her busy soccer schedule and heavy course load, she found herself fixating on how each grade would bring her closer to medical school. “I was running myself so thin trying to be the best college student,” she says. “It almost seems like they’re setting you up to fail because of the sheer amount of work and amount of classes you have to take at the same time, and how you’re also expected to do so much.”

 

At first, Spigner hesitated to seek help at the university’s counseling center, which was conspicuously located in the psychology building, separate from the health center. “No one wanted to be seen going up to that office,” she says. But she began to experience intense mood swings. At times, she found herself crying uncontrollably, unable to leave her room, only to feel normal again in 30 minutes. She started skipping classes and meals, avoiding friends and professors, and holing up in her dorm. In the spring of her freshman year, she saw a psychiatrist on campus, who diagnosed her with bipolar disorder, and her symptoms worsened. The soccer team wouldn’t allow her to play after she missed too many practices, so she left the team. In October of her sophomore year, she withdrew from school on medical leave, feeling defeated. “When you’re going through that and you’re looking around on campus, it doesn’t seem like anyone else is going through what you’re going through,” she says. “It was probably the loneliest experience.”

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Researchers discover marijuana’s anxiety relief effects

coannabinoid receptors

The discovery of cannabinoid receptors may help explain why marijuana users say they take the drug mainly to reduce anxiety.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have found cannabinoid receptors, through which marijuana exerts its effects, in a key emotional hub in the brain involved in regulating anxiety and the flight-or-fight response.

 

 

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There is more depression among clergy than the general population: Study

Clergy members are at a higher risk of depression.

Using phone surveys and written questionnaires, researchers from the Clergy Health Initiative at Duke Divinity School decided to look into the mental health of members of the clergy.  They interviewed over 1,700 United Methodist pastors, and found that depression is about 1.6 times higher in that group compared to the general population (8.7% versus 5.5%).

 

 

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Brains of children from violent homes function same as combat soldiers

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Witnessing violence can have a traumatic effect on the brain.

Scientists at the University College of London (UCL) and the Anna Freud Center liken the impact of family violence on the brains of children to the brains of soldiers exposed to combat. Both kinds of combat result in hypersensitivity to danger and put subjects at risk for developing anxiety disorders.

 

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Feeling anxious? 5 Scientifically proven relaxation techniques

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Is it time to destress and relax?

Everyone gets anxious from time to time: there’s public speaking, job interviews, the dentist and all the rest. For about one in six of us this will cross over into what psychologists term a disorder at some point in our lives. This is when people are almost continuously anxious and find it difficult to concentrate, have trouble sleeping and become irritable and restless…

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Delicate Balance in the Way Your Brain Controls Fear

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Fear begins in your brain

The eerie music in the movie theater swells; the roller coaster crests and begins its descent; something goes bump in the night. Suddenly, you’re scared: your heart thumps, your stomach clenches, your throat tightens, your muscles freeze you in place.

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How Bad Dreams Are Associated With Health Problems

bad dreams

Bad dreams are associated with health problems – from insomnia, fatigue and headaches, to depression and anxiety

One in 20 people suffers with frequent or chronic nightmares, writes Roger Dobson.  In one of the biggest studies in the area, results show that bad dreams are associated with health problems  –  from insomnia, fatigue and headaches, to depression and anxiety.

 

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Breaking Up is Harder for Men than Women

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Young men find breaking up from a relationship more painful than women

Young men find breaking up from a relationship more painful than women, a new report has found.
It suggests that the anguish caused by love described by artists such as Morrissey is felt genuinely and perhaps explains their continuing appeal to fans.
Contrary to popular belief it is men who suffer more when a relationship ends and are more affected by the highs and lows of romance, according to a study from Wake Forest University in North Carolina.
The survey of 1,000 unmarried adults aged 18-23 concluded that despite putting on a brave face men were more emotionally vulnerable than women when it comes to dating.
This may be because women often have close relationships with family and friends in addition to a partner whereas a young man’s romantic partner may be his primary source of intimacy. When a relationship goes wrong it has a greater impact on men’s identity and self-worth, researchers said.
Professor Robin Simon, who co-wrote the study, said: “Our paper sheds light on the association between non-marital romantic relationships and emotional well-being among men and women on the threshold of adulthood.
“Surprisingly, we found young men are more reactive to the quality of ongoing relationships.”
The researchers concluded that young women were more affected by the whether they were in a relationship or not rather than whether it was consistently happy. Rather than talking about it with friends men were more likely to express their feelings through drink or drugs.
Prof Simon said: “Women express emotional distress with depression while men express emotional distress with substance problems.”
The research, published in the Journal of Health and Social Behaviour, was originally gathered for a long-term study of mental health and the transition to adulthood.
Via The Telegraph

Contrary to popular belief it is men who suffer more when a relationship ends and are more affected by the highs and lows of romance, according to a study from Wake Forest University in North Carolina.

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Study: Women Who Take Antidepressants During Pregnancy at an Increased Risk of Miscarriage

depression and pregnancy

Study: Link between antidrepressants and miscarriage.

Pregnancy is often fraught with complications, not least for women suffering from depression while carrying a child: new research suggests that women who take antidepressant medications during pregnancy may have an increased risk of miscarriage.

 

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Bacteria Found in Garden Soil That Can Make You Smarter and Happier

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Bacteria found in soil can decrease anxiety and increase intelligence.

Mycobacterium vaccae bacteria are already known to decrease anxiety, but it might have even more dramatic properties. Recent studies on mice suggest the bacteria, commonly found in the soils of people’s gardens, also increases intelligence and the ability to learn.

 

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Top 10 Fears and Phobias That Really Scare People

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Things that scare people.

Whether you jump at the sight of a spider or work up a sweat at the mere mention of getting on an airplane, fears and phobias abound. About 19.2 million American adults ages 18 and over, or some 8.7 percent of people in this age group in a given year, have some type of specific phobia, or extreme fear. Here are some of the worst.

 

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