Influencers are flocking to a surprising new kind of social media

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Influencers are flocking to a surprising new kind of social media

350+ influencers with a collective audience of 3.5 billion people are flocking to a platform called Escapex, which gives them their own apps. It’s part of the next wave of social media focused on smaller, more private groups.

Last week, actor Jeremy Renner posted a time-lapse video of himself trying on different outfits in front of the mirror. “Suiting up for the Avengers press tour,” he wrote. “What are you wearing?” More than 2,000 people commented on the post (some offered outfit tips, but many agreed he looked better without a shirt). Others said good luck, or jovially wished everyone a happy Friday.

None of this was happening on Instagram, but on Renner’s own app, where his most die-hard fans gather to gush about their favorite actor. They do more than just comment on Renner’s photos, videos, and give-away contests. They also post their own images in a “fan feed”–a quick scroll reveals a woman’s before-and-after haircut, a call for recommendations for a trip to L.A., and a shot of tomato soup and parmesan-crusted chicken with bacon, which a fan had made from another fan’s cookbook.

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More than a game, Fortnite is emerging as the best new social network

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The wild popularity of the shooter game is a reminder that socializing is way more fun when you’re actually doing something with your friends.

It has more than 200 million users, up to 8 million of whom are online at any one time. Most spend six to 10 hours a week on the platform. And half of teens say they use it to keep up with friends.

Snapchat? Instagram? Twitch?

Nope. Fortnite. The wildly popular online video game has quietly become one of the planet’s biggest social networks. Not in a traditional sense, of course. Fortnite Battle Royale is, first and foremost, a last-man-standing, shooter-style game, especially popular among teens and twentysomethings. (Disclaimer here: I’m not a hardcore Fortnite player, though I know plenty of people who are.) In the game, 100 players at a time jump out of a flying bus and onto an island. Combatants are left to duke it out, Hunger Games-style, with a variety of weapons, armor, “healables,” and other tools at their disposal. Though the premise is violent, the game itself really isn’t, with none of the gore or blood of more graphic offerings. Eventually, the final combatant claims the coveted “Victory Royale.” All told, each match lasts around 20 minutes.

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A photographer asked teenagers to edit their photos until they thought they looked ‘social media ready,’ and the results are shocking

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“Selfie Harm” by Rankin shows how quick and easy it is to transform your appearance for social media. Rankin

  • A new photo series shows the lengths some people go to to edit their photos for Instagram.
  • The project, by renowned photographer Rankin, asked 15 British teenagers to take five minutes editing their appearances to make them “social media-ready.”
  • Most of them made their noses narrower, slimmed their faces, edited out their freckles, enlarged their eyes and lips, and added makeup.
  • Rankin says the project highlights that “we are living in a world of FOMO, sadness, increased anxiety, and Snapchat dysmorphia.”

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Cost per like is the new cost per wear

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Twenty-four hours before leaving for a weekend trip to Miami, I went into a panic. I needed new swimsuits. New shorts. New tops. New sandals. I speed-shopped through H&M, Aritzia, and Zara, recklessly swiping my card, as if I were on my own version of Supermarket Sweep. I wasn’t preoccupied by where to go, what to do, what to eat and drink when I landed. The first thing on my mind was, What am I going to wear? More specifically, What am I going to wear for Instagram?

It’s become my worst habit. I shop before every trip, whether I’m going abroad for a week or just a quick weekend escape. With the exciting prospect of fun activities, new locations backdrops, and Living My Best Life #content opportunities, my inner faux-influencer comes out. As frivolous as it feels, I have a lot of fun crafting the perfect ‘gram—from the pose to the outfit.

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Snapchat lets you take a photo of an object to buy it on Amazon

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See, snap, sale. In a rare partnership for Amazon, the commerce giant will help Snapchat challenge Instagram and Pinterest for social shopping supremacy. Today Snapchat announced it’s slowly rolling out a new visual product search feature, confirming TechCrunch’s July scoop about this project, codenamed “Eagle.”

Users can use Snapchat’s camera to scan a physical object or barcode, which brings up a card showing that item and similar ones along with their title, price, thumbnail image, average review score and Prime availability. When they tap on one, they’ll be sent to Amazon’s app or site to buy it. Snapchat determines if you’re scanning a song, QR Snapcode or object, and then Amazon’s machine vision tech recognizes logos, artwork, package covers or other unique identifying marks to find the product. It’s rolling out to a small percentage of U.S. users first before Snap considers other countries.

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The booming business of luxury chicken diapers

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It’s Instagram’s fault.

Julie Baker never intended to become a figurehead of the luxury chicken-diaper industry. Before she launched her brand Pampered Poultry in 2010, she had never even heard of chicken diapers.

Around 10 years ago, Baker was raising chickens with her daughter on their small farm in Claremont, New Hampshire when she first saw a YouTube video of a chicken wearing what looked to be an upside-down apron that stretched across its backside. The diaper, so to speak, was used to catch chicken poop so the birds wouldn’t leave droppings everywhere (chickens do not urinate separately from defecation. Their urine is technically in their excrement). “I’m like, ‘Oh my goodness, I so need to do that,’” Baker said. Baker’s daughter liked to bring her favorite chicken, an Old English hen named Abigail, inside their house, and because chickens poop close to a dozen times per day, Baker needed a better system for managing Abigail’s excrement.

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The 5 trends that will change how social media is used in 2015

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According to a recent Duke University study, social media spending at companies, currently represents 9% of marketing budgets, and that’s forecast to rise to nearly 25% within five years, but half of marketers interviewed said they couldn’t show what impact social media had on their business – at all.   Continue reading… “The 5 trends that will change how social media is used in 2015”

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