People with this eye color make the most money

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The human eye boasts a riveting evolutionary journey. Ninety-five percent of all living organisms possess the ability of sight, though not a single pair perceives the world the same. For the developed beasts, vision funds everything from poetry to judicious engagement. At one time, brown eyes were the human default, but a chain of mutations has authored varying shades of blue, green and even gray. You’ve likely read poesy dedicated to the each, but what real-world associations does eye color submit?

Thankfully, the authors over at 1-800 contact have done the leg work for us, surveying 1,000 people in regards to the practical perception of “peepers”.

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Powerful people think they are taller than they actually are

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The study looked at whether the psychological perception of power may cause people to feel taller than they truly are.

The Swedish-born Chairman of BP Carl-Henric Svanberg touched off a firestorm of controversy in June 2010 with his remarks about his company’s reaction to the Gulf oil spill.

“… we care about the small people. I hear comments sometimes that large oil companies are greedy companies or don’t care. But that is not the case in BP. We care about the small people.

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Deaf Adults See Better Than Hearing People

Adults born deaf react more quickly to objects at the edge of their visual field!

Adults born deaf react more quickly to objects at the edge of their visual field than hearing people, according to groundbreaking new research by the University of Sheffield.

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Part of the Brain That Tracks Limbs in Space Discovered

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New research shows that the brain’s parietal cortex tracks the position of your limbs as you move through space by combining tactile information from your skin with “proprioceptive” information about the position of your hand relative to your body

Scientists have discovered the part of the brain that tracks the position of our limbs as we move through space.

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Brain Naturally Follows Scientific Method? Less Effort to Register ‘Predictable’ Images

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The brain does not predict the unpredictable: The sight of bars apparently moving from bottom left to top right (dotted line) evokes activity in the primary visual cortex (V1).

It turns out that there is a striking similarity between how the human brain determines what is going on in the outside world and the job of scientists. Good science involves formulating a hypothesis and testing whether this hypothesis is compatible with the scientist’s observations. Researchers in the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt together with the University of Glasgow have shown that this is what the brain does as well. A study shows that it takes less effort for the brain to register predictable as compared to unpredictable images.

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Built-in Amps: How Subtle Head Motions, Quiet Sounds Are Reported to the Brain

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A single hair cell from a frog ear magnified by a scanning electron microscope.

The phrase “perk up your ears” made more sense last year after scientists discovered how the quietest sounds are amplified in the cochlea before being transmitted to the brain.

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Seeing the Brain Hear Reveals Surprises About How Sound Is Processed

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The left shows thousands of dye-loaded cells in the mouse auditory cortex over a large area. The right shows the preferred frequency of many cells, and shows that neighboring cells can have dramatically different frequency preference.

New research shows our brains are a lot more chaotic than previously thought, and that this might be a good thing. Neurobiologists at the University of Maryland have discovered information about how the brain processes sound that challenges previous understandings of the auditory cortex that suggested an organization based on precise neuronal maps. In the first study of the auditory cortex conducted using advanced imaging techniques, Patrick Kanold, Assistant Professor of Biology, Shihab Shamma, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Sharba Bandyopadhyay, post-doctoral.

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Everybody Laughs, Everybody Cries: Researchers Identify Universal Emotions

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Laughter is a universal language, according to new research

Here’s a piece of research that might leave you tickled: laughter is a universal language, according to new research. The study, conducted with people from Britain and Namibia, suggests that basic emotions such as amusement, anger, fear and sadness are shared by all humans.

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Face Recognition Ability Inherited Separately from IQ

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Recognizing faces is an important social skill, but not all of us are equally good at it.

Recognizing faces is an important social skill, but not all of us are equally good at it. Some people are unable to recognize even their closest friends (a condition called prosopagnosia), while others have a near-photographic memory for large numbers of faces. Now a twin study by collaborators at MIT and in Beijing shows that face recognition is heritable, and that it is inherited separately from general intelligence or IQ.

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How Music ‘Moves’ Us: Listeners’ Brains Second-Guess the Composer

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Our brains continuously predict what is going to happen next

New research predicts that expectations about what is going to happen next in a piece of music should be different for people with different musical experience and sheds light on the brain mechanisms involved.

Have you ever accidentally pulled your headphone socket out while listening to music? What happens when the music stops? Psychologists believe that our brains continuously predict what is going to happen next in a piece of music. So, when the music stops, your brain may still have expectations about what should happen next.

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Best Visual Illusion Of The Year Contest

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The contest is a celebration of the ingenuity and creativity of the worlds premier visual illusion research community. Visual illusions are those perceptual experiences that do not match the physical reality. Our perception of the outside world is generated indirectly by brain mechanisms, and so all visual perception is illusory to some extent.

The study of visual illusions is therefore of critical importance to the understanding of the basic mechanisms of sensory perception, as well as to cure many diseases of the visual system.

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