A billion people live in the slums of the world’s megacities—all overlooked in coronavirus planning

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A market area in Dhaka, the Bangladeshi capital, crowded with people despite the coronavirus pandemic, May 12, 2020.

Sprawling urban areas in Brazil, Nigeria and Bangladesh are all seeing COVID-19 infections rise rapidly.

A billion people live in the slums of the world’s megacities—and they’re being missed by coronavirus plans

Having ravaged some of the world’s wealthiest cities, the coronavirus pandemic is now spreading into the megacities of developing countries. Sprawling urban areas in Brazil, Nigeria, and Bangladesh are all seeing COVID-19 infections rise rapidly.

We study the fragility and resilience of such cities and their urban peripheries, with the aim of encouraging data-driven policy decisions. Given its deadly trajectory in marginalized communities of hard-hit New York and London, coronavirus may well devastate much poorer cities.

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There’s new evidence giving cash to the poor is more transformative than we thought

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When it comes to poverty alleviation in the developing world, cash transfer schemes have been at the center of a difficult debate. For years, donor agencies and governments were urged to integrate the poor into their economies by providing them with a basic amount of cash. Yet those programs have been dogged by controversies, with critics arguing they encourage dependency, negatively impact labor, and pit community members against each other.

Using evidence collected in eight countries in sub-Saharan Africa over a decade, a new paper dispels some of these common misperceptions about unconditional cash transfers in Africa. The research was conducted through the Transfer Project, a multi-partner initiative that includes the UN agencies for children and food, national governments besides national and international researchers. Unconditional cash transfers, or UCT, are different from universal basic income in that they are time-bound and are given to poor households who make spending decisions consistent with their needs.

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The Shrinking Income of Young Americans

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American families are grappling with stagnant wage growth, as the costs of health care, education, and housing continue to climb. But for many of America’s younger workers, “stagnant” wages shouldn’t sound so bad. In fact, they might sound like a massive raise.

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25 signs that the global economy is broken and obsolete

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By Adam Riva: The global economy and any form of government that utilizes it are inherently obsolete and structurally unsound. They cannot be “fixed” because their very underpinning is a mishmash of competition, hierarchy, fractional reserve banking, and fiat currency – all operating under scarcity, coercion, inequality, and varying forms and degrees of economic slavery. We must stop trying to patch the tire and replace it altogether. We are long overdue for a true revolution in the monetary sector of society.

 

 

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Seven Reasons Why the Value of Human Life is Increasing Exponentially

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Futurist Thomas Frey: What’s the value of a human life?

For some of you this is a very disconcerting question because it attempts to put a dollar value on a person, something we value in far different ways.

 

 

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Educational technology is making achievement gaps bigger between rich and poor

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Poor kids don’t receive as much guidance in a library as affluent kids do.

“The Badlands” is the local name for the Philadelphia neighborhood of Kennsington. The neighborhood is pockmarked with empty lots and burned-out row houses, the area has an unemployment rate of 29 percent and a poverty rate of 90 percent. The neighborhood of Chestnut Hill is just a few miles to the northwest of Kennsington but seems to belong to a different universe. In Chestnut Hill, educated professionals shop the boutiques along Germantown Avenue and return home to gracious stone and brick houses, the average price of which hovers above $400,000.

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Northeast corridor is the wealthiest region in the U.S.

The Northeast region shows a kind of wealth belt unmatched even on the West Coast.

America is a tremendously unequal place at the county level.  In 2012, the median household income in the poorest county (Wilcox County, Alabama) was $22,126. In Falls Church, Virginia, where highly educated defense contractors and federal government workers cluster, the median income last year was $121,250, more than five times higher.

 

 

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Being a young adult in America is a financial nightmare

Between the ages of 25 and 34, 41.3% percent of Americans will spend at least a year earning less than 150 percent of the poverty line.

In the world’s richest country, poverty is an astonishingly common experience. Almost 40 percent of American adults experience it for at least a year by age 60.  But poverty is especially common among young adults in America.

 

 

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