How the end of Moore’s Law will usher in a new era in computing

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Will the next evolution of technology super power our computers?

In 1965 Gordon Moore, the founder of Intel, predicted that the number of components that could fit on a microchip would double every year for the next decade.

Moore revised his prediction in 1975 to a doubling of components every two years – a prophecy that remained true for another four decades.

The ramifications on the world of technology and, by extension, society itself of what is now known as “Moore’s Law” have proven immeasurable.

The doubling of transistors – semi-conductor devices that switch electronic signals and power – meant that technology would become exponentially more powerful, smaller and cheaper.

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Here’s how quantum computer supremacy will impact self-driving cars

 

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Quantum supremacy, achieved?

The news recently was agog with the claim that the so-called and highly sought “quantum supremacy” had been achieved via an effort undertaken by Google researchers.

Not everyone agreed though that the Google effort warranted waving the superlative supremacy flag.

That’s not to say that the use of their 54-qubit Sycamore processor wasn’t notable, and in fact, does provide another handy stride toward achieving viable quantum computing, but whether it was the vaunted moment of true supreme magnificence is something that many would argue is premature and supremely debatable.

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You won’t see quantum internet coming

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The quantum internet is coming sooner than you think—even sooner than quantum computing itself. When things change over, you might not even notice. But when they do, new rules will protect your data against attacks from computers that don’t even exist yet.

Despite the fancy name, the “quantum internet” won’t be some futuristic new way to navigate online. It won’t produce any mind-blowing new content, at least not for decades. The quantum internet will look more or less the same as the internet you’re using now, but scientists and cryptographers hope it could provide protection against not only theoretical threats but also those we haven’t dreamed up yet.

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The next tech talent shortage: Quantum computing researchers

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Christopher Savoie, founder and chief executive of a start-up called Zapata, offered jobs this year to three scientists who specialize in an increasingly important technology called quantum computing. They accepted.

Several months later, the Cambridge, Mass., company was still waiting for the State Department to approve visas for the specialists. All three are foreigners, born in Europe and Asia.

Whether the delays were the result of tougher immigration policy or just red tape, Mr. Savoie’s predicament was typical of a growing concern among American businesses and universities: Unless policies and priorities change, they will have trouble attracting the talent needed to build quantum technology, which could make today’s computers look like toys.

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IBM makes 20 qubit quantum computing machine available as a cloud service

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IBM has been offering quantum computing as a cloud service since last year when it came out with a 5 qubit version of the advanced computers. Today, the company announced that it’s releasing 20-qubit quantum computers, quite a leap in just 18 months. A qubit is a single unit of quantum information.

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Quantum Memory for Communication Networks of the Future

Quantum networks able to protect  information better than the current communication networks.

Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in storing quantum information using two ‘entangled’ light beams. Quantum memory or information storage is a necessary element of future quantum communication networks. The new findings are published in Nature Physics.

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First Electronic Quantum Processor Created

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The two-qubit processor is the first solid-state quantum processor that resembles a conventional computer chip and is able to run simple algorithms

A team led by Yale University researchers has created the first rudimentary solid-state quantum processor, taking another step toward the ultimate dream of building a quantum computer.

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Breakthrough In Quantum Control Of Light

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Implications For Banking, Drug Design, And More

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have recently demonstrated a breakthrough in the quantum control of photons, the energy quanta of light. This is a significant result in quantum computation, and could eventually have implications in banking, drug design, and other applications.

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