Entrepreneurs: How To Define Your Future In The Exponential Age

Recently, I’ve been impressed by a vision of the future as shared by serial entrepreneur and CEO Udo Gollub. He has noted that what happened to Kodak will happen to many industries in the next 10 years. But most don’t see it coming. Did you think, in 1998, that 3 years later you would never take pictures on film or paper again?

Digital cameras were invented in 1975. The first models had only 10,000 pixels of image resolution, but followed Moore’s law (like transistors, we’ve doubled the number of pixels per square inch every year). Similar to many exponentially growing technologies, it was a disappointment for a long time, but grew progressively more superior and went mainstream in only a few short years.

Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age.

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Mobile trends in job searching

The number of mobile job seekers will climb to 50% by the end of 2015.

Simply Hired reports in a new survey on job search trends that the use of mobile devices for job seeking continues to increase. Simply Hired found that 30% of its job search traffic came from mobile devices. LinkedIn reported a similar trend in the third quarter of 2013, with mobile accounting for 38% of unique visitors.

 

 

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Internet freedom on the decline globally

The annual Freedom on the Net report from Freedom House is out, and like in most such reports, the actual rankings are largely unsurprising. Iceland, the frozen whistleblower nirvana, ranked first, and second was Estonia, the tiny Baltic country that gave us Skype. China, Cuba, and Iran came in last, obviously.

 

 

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Here’s what you might have missed about the U.S. jobs report

Like the unemployment rate, the employment-population ratio is also affected by labor participation.

The US jobs report last week added to a long string of lackluster monthly installments of data, but at least one thing has been looking up: The unemployment rate is ticking down steadily, dropping almost a tenth of a percentage point with each new report.

 

 

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What holds women back from entrepreneurship?

Fear of failure and lack of self confidence holds women from entrepreneurship.

One reason there are significantly fewer women entrepreneurs than men entrepreneurs is because women often don’t think they are capable of launching their own businesses, according to a new report released by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor 2012 Women’s Report.

 

 

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The cost of raising a child today

American families can expect to spend about $250,000 to raise a child for the next 17 years.

With Laura Sowa’s husband working strictly on sales commission in a down economy, money has been tight for several years now.  Laura lives in Nashville and she works hard to keep things as normal as possible for her two daughters.  But “normal” these days is being redefined.  This hit home for her recently as she listened to the girls playing “shopping trip” in the next room.

 

 

 

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Price of brand-name drugs rises sharply

Brand-name drug prices rise sharply while generic drug prices plummet.

Brand-name prescription drug prices are rising faster than the rate of inflation, while the price of generic drugs has plummeted, creating the largest gap so far between the two,according to a report published Wednesday by the pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts.

 

 

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Understanding why airline travel has become an expensive, annoying and cramped experience

Fewer flights and smaller aircraft leading to many more passengers per flight.

Airline travel today mostly stinks.  It is thanks to higher costs, worse service, and truly uncomfortable in-flight conditions. But understanding why life in the air isn’t particularly good takes a little work. Actually, it takes a lot of work because the Department of Transportation’s new assessment of the airline industry runs a lugubrious 78 pages and is laden with enough charts, statistics, and graphs to make Battlefield Earth seem entertaining.

 

 

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