Google Celebrates The Career Of Microchip Inventor Robert Noyce

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Inventor Robert Norton Noyce

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates the life and career of inventor Robert Noyce, co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and Intel. Noyce, who died in 1990, is credited with the invention of the integrated circuit. His patent for a “Semiconductor Device and Lead Structure” paved the way for the semiconductor revolution of the next decades.

He was called the Mayor of Silicon Valley and his relaxed corporate structures encouraged his employees to experiment in an era of buttoned-down austerity. Without Noyce and his various projects, you probably wouldn’t be reading this right now…

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Vision Could Be Improved By Injecting Semiconductor Specks Into Retinas

Vision Could Be Improved By Injecting Semiconductor Specks Into Retinas 

Retina

The idea of creating a bionic eye to assist people with seriously impaired vision is definitely exciting. But installing a silicon chip into a human eyeball to assist the retinas has some drawbacks, the least of which being that the chip itself can block light from falling on areas of the retina that are healthy and still working properly. So Jeffrey Olsen at the University of Colorado Hospital has come up with a different approach.

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Making Materials That Repel All Liquids

Making Materials That Repel All Liquids 

 Water (dyed blue) and hexadecane (dyed red), an oil, bead up on an omniphobic surface, which repels all liquids.

Materials under development at MIT could lead to coatings that repel both water and oil. A group of MIT researchers have created an improved set of design rules for making any surface impervious to any liquid, be it water or gasoline. Such materials could eventually have promise as fingerprint-repelling coatings, fuel filters, self-washing car paints, and stain-resistant clothing.

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Cylindrical Solar Cells For Big Buildings

Cylindrical Solar Cells For Big Buildings

 Cylindrical solar cells, which can be arranged in rows to make solar panels,
are particularly suited for generating power atop commercial buildings.

A startup is selling cylindrical solar cells that can generate more power than conventional panels.

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Nanosoccer – Testing Ground For Future Robot Technology

 [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLGOMDfPAsw[/youtube]

NIST’s conducts its nanosoccer competitions and demonstrations in conjunction with RoboCup, an international organization dedicated to using the game of soccer as a testing ground for the robotics technologies of the future.

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Graphene – World’s Strongest Known Material

Strongest Known Material

 

Graphene, praised for its electrical properties, has been proven the strongest known material.

Materials scientists have been singing graphene’s praises since it was first isolated in 2005. The one-atom-thick sheets of carbon conduct electrons better than silicon and have been made into fast, low-power transistors. Now, for the first time, researchers have measured the intrinsic strength of graphene, and they’ve confirmed it to be the strongest material ever tested. The finding provides good evidence that graphene transistors could take the heat in future ultrafast microprocessors.

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Stanford Builds Better Chip With Carbon Nanoribbon Technology

 Stanford Builds Better Chip With Carbon Nanoribbon Technology

 Y-shaped nanotubes are ready-made transistors

For the first time, a research team led by Hongjie Dai, the J. G. Jackson and C. J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, has made transistors called “field-effect transistors”-a critical component of computer chips-with graphene that can operate at room temperature. Graphene is a form of carbon derived from graphite. Other graphene transistors, made with wider nanoribbons or thin films, require much lower temperatures.

“For graphene transistors, previous demonstrations of field-effect transistors were all done at liquid helium temperature, which is 4 Kelvin [-452 Fahrenheit],” said Dai, the lead investigator. His group’s work is described in a paper published online in the May 23 issue of the journal Physical Review Letters.

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