Play-a-Grill lets you hear music through your teeth

playagrill2000

Would you use a tongue-controlled MP3 grill?

Ever since Zeon took a hammer to my boombox, I haven’t been able to rock out to my favorite New Kids on the Block tunes at work. Aisen Caro Chacin’s invention may prove to be an acceptable alternative. Her tongue-controlled MP3 player uses the palate to carry sound to the ears…

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Skinny Player – MP3 Player Shaped Like a Band-Aid and Powered by Body Heat

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Skinny Player

This MP3 player is extremely rudimentary — it only has one button: a Play/Stop button. Yeah, this thing is more basic than an iPod shuffle. The Skinny Player, as it’s called isn’t powered by a battery though. It runs off of your body heat. (Pics)

 

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France to Offer Government Subsidies for Music Purchased Online

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Government Subsidized Music?

There are very few things this writer loves about France, but here are two: government-subsidized healthcare, and, now, government-subsidized music. That’s right, the country of Debussy and Gainsbourg will now (partially) pay for its young citizens’ digital music.

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I-dosing: Teens Getting High on Digital Drugs

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZcgUEkBIX0[/youtube]

I-dosing – an alarming new trend among teens.

Kids around the country are getting high on the internet, thanks to MP3s that induce a state of ecstasy. And it could be a gateway drug leading teens to real-world narcotics.  At least, that’s what Kansas News 9 is reporting about a phenomenon called “i-dosing,” which involves finding an online dealer who can hook you up with “digital drugs” that get you high through your headphones.

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Forget Hearing Aids. Now We’re Talking About Brain Aids!

 

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Can You Hear Me Now?

Needing assistance with your most basic of senses is never something anyone wants to advertise. Thus we’ve come up with handy ways of making them socially acceptable. Enough nerdy kids like myself needed glasses that they’ve become fashion accessories in and of themselves. And modern hearing aids usually focus on being tiny and out of sight. But Oticon out of Denmark has something new on the market. The Agil may not be the stealthiest of assistive listening devices, but it holds a new sound processing algorithm designed to reproduce sounds much more realistically.

 

This handy little things is designed to:

“Minimize the cognitive energy expended in typical listening environments without compromising sound quality and speech understanding.”

So what does that mean you ask?

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Walkman Named Top Music Invention of Last 50 Years

Sony’s music player has beaten Dolby sound, compact discs and the ubiquitous iPod to come top of the list of “ten most important musical innovations of the last 50 years” published by T3 magazine. Its victory comes in the week that the Walkman celebrated its 30th birthday.
The first Walkman was the blue-and-silver model TPS-L2, which went on sale in Japan on July 1, 1979 and started a musical revolution.
Never before had consumers been able to listen to music as they walked down the street, without balancing a tape player on their shoulder.
Within two years of its launch, it had become the must-have gadget around the world, confounding early critics who said it would never take off without a record button.
Kat Hanniford at T3 said: “It changed the way we access music, changed how often we could access music, and changed a generation.”
She said the MP3 digital music format, which came second in the list, and the iPod music player, which came third, would be impossible without the pioneering work of Sony’s Walkman.
The Compact Disc is ranked fourth, followed by Napster the ground-breaking illegal file-sharing site.
Dolby, the British company, which introduced multi-channel sound to cinema, is ranked sixth in the list.
The original Walkman was created for the co-founder of Sony, Akio Morita, who wanted to be able to listen to operas during his frequent plane trips between Japan and the United States.
In Britain the gadget was marketed as the Stowaway and America as the Soundabout but the popularity of the device – one of the world’s first truly global gadgets – meant the name Walkman spread, and before long Sony made sure all were called the same name. Its appeal was helped by the the relatively low price tag of $200.
In ten years Sony sold 50 million units of the device.
It is still a leading portable music player manufacturer, with its latest digital device the X Series acclaimed as one of the best digital video and music devices on the market.
T3’s list of Top Most Important Musical Innovations of the last 50 years:
1. Sony Walkman
2. MP3 format
3. Apple iPod 1st Generation
4. CD
5. Napster
6. Dolby
7. DAB radio
8. Boombox
9. Sonos Multi-Room Music System
10. Panasonic Technics DJ deck

sony walkman 837

Top music invention of the past 50 years

Sony’s music player has beaten Dolby sound, compact discs and the ubiquitous iPod to surge to the top of the list of the “ten most important musical innovations of the last 50 years” published by T3 magazine. Its victory comes in the week that the Walkman celebrated its 30th birthday.

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Cheaper And More Reliable Lithium-Ion Batteries

Cheaper And More Reliable Lithium-Ion Batteries

Lithium-ion cells that use polymer electrolytes can be affordably packaged in compact, flexible pouches  

A new incarnation of lithium-ion batteries based on solid polymers is in the works. Berkeley, CA-based startup Seeo, Inc. says its lithium-ion cells will be safer, longer-lasting, lighter, and cheaper than current batteries. Seeo’s batteries use thin films of polymer as the electrolyte and high-energy-density, light-weight electrodes. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is now making and testing cells designed by the University of California, Berkeley spinoff.

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