Scientists create the world’s first room temperature superconductor

B6173FE2-551E-4152-9210-E3E1842C8363

Superconducting materials typically require extremely cool temperatures to operate, which is demonstrated in this photo. But a new discovery could change that

Since its discovery more than a century ago, superconductivity has come to play a powerful role in many modern day technologies, such as maglev trains and MRI scans, but its utility has been limited by the need for extremely cool operating temperatures. Scientists are now claiming a big breakthrough in this area, creating what they say is the first material capable of superconductivity at room temperature.

The work was led by Ranga Dias at the University of Rochester, and aims to overcome one of the major roadblocks in expanding the uses of superconductive materials. These materials exhibit no electrical resistance and expel a magnetic field, but because they typically only function at temperatures below -140 °C (-220 °F), they require expensive equipment to maintain.

“Because of the limits of low temperature, materials with such extraordinary properties have not quite transformed the world in the way that many might have imagined,” says Dias. “However, our discovery will break down these barriers and open the door to many potential applications.”

Continue reading… “Scientists create the world’s first room temperature superconductor”

0

These EV chargers make money for their building-owner hosts

 BBF562E0-8B13-478B-83E7-4459033B71C5

Los Angeles-based EV charging startup Xeal, which uses predictive AI software to maximize the profits of charging stations, will boost passive income for commercial and residential building owners. It’s just successfully closed its seed investment round.

Continue reading… “These EV chargers make money for their building-owner hosts”

0

Why wireless vehicle charging makes sense for smart cities

1ACBC16F-CA8A-4517-AE61-BBC16C87FCBF

Image of proposed wireless charging stations

Investments we make today in urban EV infrastructure must take into account future requirements for ride sharing, transit and utilities

 

As the world’s population grows increasingly urban — it’s expected that by 2050, 70 per cent of individuals will live in urban areas — it’s critical for these regions to have the infrastructure in place to support quick, convenient and electric mobility. From autonomous vehicles, to electric urban transit, to effective energy management by utilities, successful deployment depends on cities investing in the proper accompanying charging infrastructure. To that end, there’s a good case to be made that investing in wireless charging is critical for the prosperity of urban areas.

Continue reading… “Why wireless vehicle charging makes sense for smart cities”

0

24 million EVs is the limit for current U.S. power grid until 2028

B1E97E6E-909D-4D68-B9DF-9CDD7EA28E9C

This PNNL study could help the U.S. power system keep ahead of the EV adoption curve.

 Getting the world to work without oil will not be easy. Apart from increasing EV adoption, we have to make sure the world can cope with them. Think about it: would the power grid stand too many electric cars demanding a charge at the same time? PNNL – Pacific Northwest National Laboratory – answered that question with a study saying the current US power grid can handle 24 million EVs until 2028. If the demand increases, we’ll need improvements.

It may seem far-fetched considering the entire US now has 1.5 million EVs on the roads, but that is just the tip of the iceberg. Demand for EVs tends to grow, especially when electric pickup trucks such as the Tesla Cybertruck and Rivian R1T are available.

Continue reading… “24 million EVs is the limit for current U.S. power grid until 2028”

0

Electric cars will challenge state power grids

1022DEAE-5AE0-4750-B63D-6F5C92485367

A Chevrolet Volt hybrid car connected to a charging station at a parking garage in Los Angeles.

SEATTLE — When Seattle City Light unveiled five new electric vehicle charging stations last month in an industrial neighborhood south of downtown, the electric utility wasn’t just offering a new spot for drivers to fuel up. It also was creating a way for the service to figure out how much more power it might need as electric vehicles catch on.

Seattle aims to have nearly a third of its residents driving electric vehicles by 2030. Washington state is No. 3 in the nation in per capita adoption of plug-in cars, behind California and Hawaii. But as Washington and other states urge their residents to buy electric vehicles — a crucial component of efforts to reduce carbon emissions — they also need to make sure the electric grid can handle it.

The average electric vehicle requires 30 kilowatt hours to travel 100 miles — the same amount of electricity an average American home uses each day to run appliances, computers, lights and heating and air conditioning.

An Energy Department study found that increased electrification across all sectors of the economy could boost national consumption by as much as 38 percent by 2050, in large part because of electric vehicles. The environmental benefit of electric cars depends on the electricity being generated by renewables.

Continue reading… “Electric cars will challenge state power grids”

0

Renewables meet 50% of electricity demand on Australia’s power grid for first time

A59EECBC-442D-4498-93D6-E3BB446C510A

For a brief moment solar, wind and hydro combined to deliver more than half the power into the National Electricity Market

Australia’s main electricity grid was briefly powered by 50% renewable energy this week in a new milestone that experts say will become increasingly normal.

Data on the sources of power in the National Electricity Market showed that at 11.50am on Wednesday, renewables were providing 50.2% of the power to Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania and South Australia – the five states served by the market.

Continue reading… “Renewables meet 50% of electricity demand on Australia’s power grid for first time”

0

Plug-in electric vehicles to communicate with electric companies via the cloud

electric vehicle

A two-way communication platform would allow plug-in electric vehicles to work with power grids.

Ford Motor Company and seven global automakers have joined together for a first-ever test of technology that will allow utility companies to communicate with plug-in electric vehicles via the cloud, an advancement that would help manage energy use and improve the efficiency of the power grid.

 

 

Continue reading… “Plug-in electric vehicles to communicate with electric companies via the cloud”

0

Dual-Action wind turbine generates power and water

eolewater turbine 3214123

Wind can create both power and water?

Throughout the developing world, millions of people struggle with a shortage of clean water and steady electricity. This wind turbine could solve both problems in one shot by pulling both power and water straight from the wind.

The WMS1000 Wind Turbine was invented by Marc Parent and is built by the French start-up Eole Water. Sitting atop a 24-meter mast, the machine generates electricity with a conventional 30kW direct-drive turbine in a 12-ton nacelle with a 13-meter blade diameter. The WMS1000 can self-regulate the energy it produces, allowing it to provide a steady stream of power even in gusty or choppy winds. Installing an array of the turbines, which each have a service life of 30 years, creates a small-scale, decentralized power grid perfect for remote areas…

Continue reading… “Dual-Action wind turbine generates power and water”

0

Dismantling of our Power Industry Infrastructure

Futurist-Thomas-Frey-at-US-Dept-of-Energy-Event-with-Matt-Wald

Photo of me demonstrating an unuual thermoelectric generator
with NY Times Correspondent Matthew Wald

Futurist Thomas Frey: On Wednesday I was invited to speak on a panel at the 2012 National Electricity Forum, an event sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, in Washington DC.

Continue reading… “Dismantling of our Power Industry Infrastructure”

0

Old electric car batteries to find second life on the power grid

nissan-leaf-batteryyyyy

The Nissan Leaf batteries have extended value beyond powering the car.


Reincarnation for Lithium-Ion

It’s not because a battery pack isn’t good enough for an electric or hybrid car anymore that it should go directly to a recycling plant. There are lots of potential secondary uses for batteries that can still hold more than half of their original charge. Articles have already been written about how they could be used to store wind power to reduce the intermittency problem, but a new partnership between Nissan North-America, ABB, 4R Energy, and Sumitomo Corporation of America believes that used electric car batteries (Nissan LEAF ones, in this case) could be used for residential and commercial energy storage, even acting as emergency back-up during natural disasters like last year’s earthquake and tsunami in Japan…

Continue reading… “Old electric car batteries to find second life on the power grid”

0

Nanoparticle batteries could make technology like solar and wind power more practical

wind power

Large batteries could be used for storing excess power from the electrical grid for future use.

New Stanford University research could point the way to large-scale, long-lasting power grid batteries. These kinds of batteries would be especially useful for making technologies like solar and wind power more practical, allowing vast amounts of storage to be stored for periods of time in which the skies are calm or overcast.

 

Continue reading… “Nanoparticle batteries could make technology like solar and wind power more practical”

0

Hacking the Power Grid

 

Hacking the Power Grid

Cracking a power company network and gaining access that could shut down the grid is simple, a security expert says, and he has done so in less than a day.

Ira Winkler, a penetration-testing consultant, says he and a team of other experts took a day to set up attack tools they needed then launched their attack, which paired social engineering with corrupting browsers on a power company’s desktops. By the end of a full day of the attack, they had taken over several machines, giving the team the ability to hack into the control network overseeing power production and distribution.

Continue reading… “Hacking the Power Grid”

0