Walmart’s movie plan will transform parking lots into drive-in theaters

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Walmart just made a surprising announcement: it will turn some of its store parking lots into drive-in movie theaters, using its existing real estate to revive a largely defunct way to view movies. The drive-in theaters will start going live in early August, according to the company, but they won’t be available at every Walmart destination. In case you’re wondering: yes, there will be popcorn.

Walmart announced the new plan on Twitter and has already launched a website dedicated to the new move. The drive-in theaters will arrive in partnership with Tribeca, according to Walmart, which says that its new plan will help the public watch movies while maintaining social distancing.

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Forget 8K, the Insta360 Titan records 11K that can still play back on smartphones

Insta360, the company behind cameras like the Insta360 One X, is aiming to redefine cinematic 360 with 11K footage captured by larger Micro Four Thirds sensors. On Monday, January 7, Insta360 unveiled the Titan, a cinematic 360 camera that the company says is the first standalone 360 camera to shoot in 11K. The Titan also uses the largest sensors for a standalone 360, Insta360 says, with eight Micro Four Thirds sensors.

The Titan, designed as a high-end cinematic virtual reality camera, captures 11K at 30 fps in the 360 format or 10K at 30 fps in the 3D format necessary for VR. The camera can also drop the resolution for faster frame rates, including 8K at 60 fps and 5.3K at 120 fps. Insta360 says the Micro Four Thirds sensors are essential to capturing a cinematic quality, since many use smaller sensors like the ones inside smartphones and action cameras.

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Cinematic VR Challenge shows how Virtual Reality will transform film

 

As the sun set over the Olympic Mountains on a warm and muggy Sunday, I trekked from the manicured suburbia of Sammamish, Wash., to Seattle’s historic Fort Lawton district, where an eclectic home, known as the Bird House, sits among low-hanging branches at the end of a quiet street.

The Bird House belongs to musician Perry Emge, and on this day, he and his home were playing host to the SIXR Festival’s Summer 2016 Cinematic VR Challenge.

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