World’s first NFT museum in Seattle aims to ‘pull back the curtain’ on blockchain art

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are a type of digital asset.

  • In January, the world’s first permanent NFT art museum opened its doors in Seattle.
  • It aims to “pull back the curtain” on blockchain-based digital art.
  • Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are a type of digital asset that has exploded in popularity recently, with NFT artworks selling for millions of dollars.

The world’s first permanent NFT art museum has opened in Seattle, aiming to “pull back the curtain” on blockchain-based digital art.

Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) are a type of digital asset that has exploded in popularity recently, with NFT artworks selling for millions of dollars. NFTs exist on a blockchain, a record of transactions kept on networked computers.

The museum opened its doors on 14 January, and has been providing an outlet for artists, creators, and collectors to display their NFTs in a physical setting while aiming to educate the public about this fairly new market for digital art.

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World’s first ‘vertiport’ could be used for flying taxis in future

A rendering of a future vertiport.  

One vertiport already exists in Coventry city centre in the UK.

It is currently used to launch drones into the sky. But the company that designed it, Urban Air-Port, is also trying to adapt it to flying taxis by 2024.It plans to build 200 similar facilities worldwide in the next five years.

r“It is the future of a segment of aviation that is coming. It will be here by the end of this decade. And I think in the 2030s it will start to become ubiquitous,” said Michael Whitaker, the chief commercial officer of Supernal.

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This Diamond Could Store As Much Data As 1 Billion Blu-ray Discs

Even though it has a diameter of just two inches.

By Nathaniel Mott

Adamant Namiki Precision Jewel Co. has created a diamond wafer that, according to the company, could make its way into a variety of quantum computing projects.

“A 2-inch diamond wafer theoretically enables enough quantum memory to record 1 billion Blu-ray discs,” Adamant Namiki says. “This is equivalent to all the mobile data distributed in the world in one day.” The purity of the diamonds produced using this process could allow the material to be used in quantum computers, quantum memory, and quantum sensing devices.

Adamant Namiki collaborated with Saga University to develop this new diamond creation method. The company says it originally produced a diamond wafer of this size in September 2021, but that iteration of the process introduced too many impurities for the resulting diamond to be useful in quantum computers, so it’s spent the last few months investigating that problem.

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Waste plastic broken down not in centuries but in days by an AI-engineered enzyme

Breaking up is hard to do.

That’s certainly true for common plastics like polyethylene terephthalate (PET).  A water bottle made of a thin film of PET (perhaps half a millimeter thick) takes about 450 years to degrade.  Along the way it will exist as microplastics, which are so pervasive they are even turning up in living people’s lung tissue, as we saw for the first time just a month ago.  And even those kinds of numbers are guesstimates because many studies don’t last long enough to see any appreciable degradation of PET at all.

A lot of efforts to produce biodegradable and bioresorbable plastics are making good progress, and that’s great for the future, but what about the mountains of plastic that already exist and that we keep on generating?  In the U.S., the landfill rate for discarded plastics is still about 75%!  We have a lot of work to do.

Good thing Hal Alper’s chemical engineering lab at the University of Texas is on the job.  In the April 27 issue of Nature, they report on an enzyme they developed called FAST-PETase.  Designed with the help of artificial intelligence, it degrades untreated postconsumer PET not in centuries, but in days.  And this can be done at temperatures of 50°C and below, where many types of bacteria can thrive.  See where this is going?

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Ep. 84 Russia, cybercrime, and the future of war, with Rik Ferguson.

Watch our interview with Rik Ferguson on Youtube or on the Futurati Podcast website

Rik Ferguson is vice president of security research at Trend Micro and is actively engaged in studying online threats and the underground economy. He also researches the wider implications of new developments in the Information Technology arena and their impact on security.

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‘Bored Ape’ Unicorn Raises $320M By Selling Virtual Land In Its Metaverse

By Marlize van Romburghmarlizevr

The startup behind the Bored Ape Yacht Club NFTs has raised as much as $320 million in cryptocurrency by selling 55,000 plots of virtual land in its metaverse. The virtual real estate buying frenzy over the weekend reportedly was so intense that it crashed the Ethereum network and sent fees on the blockchain system soaring. 

The land sale offered buyers the chance to buy a plot in the Otherside metaverse for around $5,800, plus transaction fees. The virtual land sale is believed to be the largest of its kind, according to Bloomberg, which calculated the total proceeds at $320 million. Reuters pinned the number at closer to $285 million, based on the price of the ApeCoin virtual currency. 

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Majority of Institutional Investors Are Actively Recommending Crypto Assets to Clients, According to Bitstamp Study

A recent study by crypto exchange platform Bitstamp finds that institutional investors are actively recommending digital assets to their clients.

The Bitstamp Crypto Pulse report, which surveyed over 5,500 professional investors and 23,000 retail investors from 23 countries across the globe, reveals that the majority of institutional investment decision-makers are endorsing crypto assets as investments to their clientele.

“Institutional investors are now actively recommending crypto to their clients and retail investors are beginning to use crypto beyond a simple trade. This is a key area to watch in subsequent waves to gauge how the current financial climate drives adoption of crypto outside the original ecosystem.”

According to the research, 68% of institutional investors surveyed say they are actively recommending crypto while 15.2% say that are doing so with caution. Just 6.4% say they are not recommending virtual assets to their clients.

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Future wearable health tech could measure gases released from skin

The study suggests future health sensors could work by detecting chemicals released from the skin.

By Tatyana Woodall

NEW RESEARCH POINTS WAY TO MONITORING METABOLIC DISEASES

Scientists have taken the first step to creating the next generation of wearable health monitors.  

Most research on measuring human biomarkers, which are measures of a body’s health, rely on electrical signals to sense the chemicals excreted in sweat. But sensors that rely on perspiration often require huge amounts of it just to get a reading. 

A new study suggests that a wearable sensor may be able to monitor the body’s health by detecting the gases released from a person’s skin. 

“It is completely non-invasive, and completely passive on the behalf of the user,” said Anthony Annerino, lead author of the study and a graduate student in materials science and engineering at The Ohio State University.  

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INSIDE PLANS FOR ‘OFF-WORLD HUMAN DNA SEED BANK’ ON MOON SO ALIEN CIVILIZATION COULD ‘RECREATE’ US

The SpaceX Crew-4 mission took some DNA to space on April 27

SPACEX just launched a lot of human DNA to the International Space Station. 

The Crew-4 mission blasted off on April 27 and part of the cargo was a biobank containing DNA from 500 different species.

One of those species was humans and there are now over 2,000 different DNA samples from lots of different people in space.

A company called LifeShip is behind the DNA collection.

It hopes to one day create an off-world genetic human seed bank on the Moon.

The idea is similar to the Global Seed Vault we have on Earth.

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Space station’s new robotic arm springs to life


By Trevor Mogg

Two spacewalkers at the International Space Station (ISS) activated the facility’s new robotic arm for the first time on Thursday, April 28.

Russian cosmonauts Oleg Artemyev and Denis Matveev concluded their spacewalk at  6:40 p.m. ET after 7 hours and 42 minutes outside the ISS, with much of that time spent working on the European Robotic Arm (ERA).

The ERA arrived at the station in July last year but it remained covered with thermal blankets until Thursday.

NASA shared footage (below) of the two cosmonauts some 250 miles above Earth as they worked to release the robotic arm from its restraints ahead of its first workout.

Getting to this stage has been a long time coming. The ERA was designed more than 30 years ago, and various technical issues over the last 20 years caused it to miss three planned missions to the ISS.

But now European Space Agency (ESA) engineers can finally celebrate the arm’s first activation in space.

The new robotic arm is about 11 meters long, weighs 1,390 pounds (630 kilograms), and includes seven joints that offer a high degree of maneuverability.

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Indy Autonomous Challenge racecar sets new speed record for driverless vehicle

BY DAVID EDWARDS 

The Indy Autonomous Challenge racecar, a Dallara AV-21 programmed by team PoliMOVE from Politecnico di Milano, Italy, and the University of Alabama, USA, has set a new land speed world record of 192.2 mph / 309.3 kph at the historic Kennedy Space Center.

Operating the Dallara AV-21, PoliMOVE set out to push the limits of a boosted engine package during test runs yesterday at Space Florida’s Launch & Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center.

The upgraded engine package, capable of delivering 30 percent more horsepower than previous models, will be on all IAC racecars moving forward. Future competitions will be announced in the coming months. 

Paul Mitchell, president, Indy Autonomous Challenge, says: “The Autonomous Challenge @ CES in January pushed our racecars to their limits and maxed out what was possible at the time.

“Yet here we are just four months later, in another iconic venue, with an upgraded engine package setting yet another world record.”

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