The secret to winning the war for talent

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In the long siege known as the war for talent, employers need a new battle plan. Instead of trying desperately to recruit from the outside to fill a growing skills gap, companies should turn to the resources that exist within their own workforces.

This is a build versus buy strategy, with greater emphasis placed on training to develop skills in-house to meet the organization’s current and future needs. As a recent Harvard Business Review article observed, rather than spending billions to acquire talent, a better approach is investing in the talent that’s already in place. “Poach-and-release is no longer a sustainable model for talent acquisition,” the authors write.

There is a greater-than-ever need for effective and efficient corporate training as the shortage of skilled workers heightens to an urgent business issue. At an education conference I attended recently, Senator Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) told the audience that the concern he hears most frequently from employers is the difficulty of hiring enough workers.

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Moneyball for business: How AI is changing talent management

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Fifteen years after Billy Beane disrupted Major League Baseball by applying analytics to scouting, corporations are rewriting the rules of recruiting.

The online games were easy–until I got to challenge number six. I was applying for a job at Unilever, the consumer-goods behemoth behind Axe Body Spray and Hellmann’s Real Mayonnaise. I was halfway through a series of puzzles designed to test 90 cognitive and emotional traits, everything from my memory and planning speed to my focus and appetite for risk. A machine had already scrutinized my application to determine whether I was fit to reach even this test-taking stage. Now, as I sat at my laptop, scratching my head over a probability game that involved wagering varying amounts of virtual money on whether I could hit my space bar five times within three seconds or 60 times within 12 seconds, an algorithm custom-built for Unilever analyzed my every click. With a timer ticking down on the screen . . . 12 . . . 11 . . . 10 . . . I furiously stabbed at my keyboard, my chances of joining one of the world’s largest employers literally at my fingertips.

More than a million job seekers have already undergone this kind of testing experience, developed by Pymetrics, a five-year-old startup cofounded by Frida Polli. An MIT-trained neuroscientist with an MBA from Harvard, Polli is pioneering new ways of assessing talent for brands such as Burger King and Unilever, based on decades of neuroscience research she says can predict behaviors common among high performers. “We realized this combination of data and machine learning would be hugely powerful, bringing recruiting from this super-antiquated, paper-and-pencil [process] into the future,” explains Polli, sitting barefoot on a couch at her spartan office near New York’s Flatiron District on a humid May morning, where about four dozen engineers, data scientists, and industrial-organizational psychologists sit behind glowing iMacs.

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News flash:It’s about the skill set, not the suit or the degree

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High School failed me. As a high school dropout, I knew I was taking a risk by rejecting the ‘normal route’ and knew I always wanted to be in the business world. During one assignment in my computer class, I did not show up in a suit and tie for the presentation. The teacher docked me for not ‘dressing proper’, which I found puzzling. After all, this class was about desktop publishing – why should this be an issue? It should be about the substance of my work and not some preconceived, superficial notion about how I looked. For me, it has always been about the substance and not the suit.

The good news is that federal aid for colleges has reached its high-water mark. The bad news is that millions of young adults feel they have no choice but to enroll in a four-year University, something that brings with it an inordinate amount of debt for many students.

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3 predictions for the future of freelancing

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Enterprises everywhere are looking for talent. And those with talents and skills that are in high demand can pretty much control their work life: where they work, how they work, compensation packages, and a host of other specifications about their work life.

This is a huge opportunity for freelancers, if they keep current with demand and continue to enhance and expand their skills. Some, in fact, are predicting that, by 2027, the majority of the workforce will be comprised of freelancers, not regular, traditional employees.

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The future of campus recruiting in 2020 and beyond

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Recruiters will need to look into their crystal balls to determine what campus recruiting will look in the future.

The employment landscape will continue to change as technology moves forward. What does this mean for campus recruiting in 2020 and beyond? It will look much different from today – students will have different majors, use different technologies, and plan for completely new and undiscovered career paths.

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Talent assessment trends for 2014

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To see the future, we have to be willing to take a good long look at what is happening in the talent acquisition world within the context of bigger picture trends. The mega trends that are shaping the future of how people do things on a global basis (i.e., empowerment via access to information, exponential growth in connectivity, ability to crunch and interpret staggering amounts of data, using collective intelligence to find truth) are all quietly at work setting the stage for major change in our industry.

 

 

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More than half of employers say they can’t find qualified workers

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A survey of employers found a huge jump in U.S. employers saying they were having trouble filling open jobs.

There are 13 million people in the United States looking for work.  It seems like anyone who wants to hire someone would have little difficulty doing so.

But many employers are saying otherwise.

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Employers Who ‘Overpay’ Workers Outperform Competitors

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The best use of money as a motivator is to pay people enough to take the issue of money off the table, so that people can focus on the work rather than on the cash.

The best use of money as a motivator can be to pay people enough to take the issue off the table.

After more than 200 years of sharing a common language, the United States and Great Britain now share a common predicament.

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A Brain Scan Could Help You Find the Perfect Career

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Forget interviews, tests and career advisers, a brain scan may soon be the best way to discover your ideal job.

Neuroscientists are getting closer to being able to pinpoint your talents just by looking at the landscape of your mind.  They are slowly mapping the brain so they can match particular areas to particular skills and knowledge.

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