How to recruit a great software developer

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It’s a seller’s market for programmers. Demand for programmers and software engineers is expected to grow by 22 percent over the next seven years, according to research conducted by IT staffing firm, Modis. The average salary for a software developer is around $96,000 and top earners approach $150,000 per year, according to the U.S. Labor Department.

NOTE: For those wanting to enter the programming profession, DaVinci Coders is currently accepting applications for the 2016 courses. Small class sizes so seating is limited.

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Top 5 things you need to be happy at work

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There’s a mountain of research on what makes people truly happy at work. What would make you happier at work? It’s not necessarily free meals and massages (though those are nice, as companies on Fortune’s list of the Best Companies To Work For have figured out). And it’s not even necessarily lots more money. We’ve scoured the research and identified five science-backed attributes that make people happy at their jobs.

NOTE: For anyone looking to transition into a high impact work environment, check out the private offices and coworking spaces currently available at the DaVinci Institute.

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Top 10 jobs that don’t exist yet, but will in the future

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Technology is moving very quickly. The landscape of modern business is set to change dramatically in the next few decades. According to top-rated futurist speaker Thomas Frey, by 2030 a predicted 2 billion jobs will disappear, but plenty of new ones will replace them. There’s work, but not as we know it…

 

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Jobs held by men are most at risk from the robot worker

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The world is on the brink of a new industrial revolution in which advances in the field of artificial intelligence will obsolete human labor, according to many economists and technologists today. Two Oxford researchers recently analyzed the skills required for more than 700 different occupations to determine how many of them would be susceptible to automation in the near future, and the news was not good: They concluded that machines are likely to take over 47 percent of today’s jobs within a few decades.

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